All Projects

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Recipient
MN DNR
2009 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,250,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results (includes Use and Dissemination)
Minnesota's native prairie covered about 18 million acres at the time of the public land surveys (1847-1908); currently less than one percent remains. This multi-faceted prairie project was designed to increase conservation of native prairie and provide tools for long-term management and assessment of this rare resource. Project results addressed:

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2009 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$550,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Recipient
BWSR
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$313,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$312,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$301,000
Recipient
Blue Earth County Drainage Authority
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$485,000

This project is a model for future drainage projects across the state and represents a fundamental shift in the way rural drainage systems interact with the landscape. This is a community-based water quality and treatment demonstration project in which landowners, local government, and state agencies have developed a watershed approach to improving water quality and replacing outdated drainage systems. The project will improve water quality, improve wildlife habitat, and develop a process for future projects by constructing water quality features within the 6,000 acre watershed.

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$900,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN - MAISRC
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$8,700,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$4,350,000

Aquatic invasive species pose critical ecological and economic challenges for the entire state and beyond. They can cause irreparable harm to fisheries and aquatic habitat as well as damage to infrastructure. The problems posed by aquatic invasive species continue to grow as existing infestations expand and new exotic species arrive, most of which are poorly understood. New ideas and approaches are needed to develop real solutions.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Through various means, human produced chemicals can make their way into surface waters where they can have adverse effects on the function of ecological communities. Of particular concern are antibiotics and other antimicrobial substances because they have the potential to create increased antibiotic resistance. While there is a background level of naturally occurring antibiotic resistance in the natural world, elevated or persistent levels caused by human activities have the potential to harm human, animal, and overall ecosystem health.

Recipient
University of St. Thomas
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$203,000

The occurrences of contaminants including antibiotics, other pharmaceuticals, and personal care products in the environment have gained increasing attention in recent years because of their potential health and ecological impacts. However, serious gaps remain in our understanding of these contaminants and the significance of the threats they may pose, such as to drinking water. Through this appropriation scientists at the University of St.

Recipient
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Division of Ecological and Water Resources
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,177,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,513,000

To address the problems caused by invasive species, the 1991 Minnesota Legislature directed the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to establish the Invasive Species Program. The program is designed to implement actions to prevent the spread of invasive species and manage invasive aquatic plants and wild animals (Minnesota Statutes 84D).
The three primary goals of the DNR Invasive Species Program are to:
1. Prevent the introduction of new invasive species into Minnesota.
2. Prevent the spread of invasive species within Minnesota.

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,000,000

The legislature granted the University of Minnesota $2,000,000 from the LCCMR to start an Aquatic Invasive Species Cooperative Research Center to address and solve aquatic invasive species (AIS) problems in the state. The University will use this initial funding to establish the administrative structure for this center, establish and renovate its facilities, start studies of Asian carp biology designed to control this species, and develop work plans for the LCCMR to ensure continuing funding for the center.

Recipient
U of MN - MAISRC
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,700,000
Recipient
MN DNR
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$260,000

Over a three-month period in 2010, approximately five million barrels of oil was spilled into the Gulf of Mexico causing extensive damage to marine and wildlife habitats and resulting in significant losses in fish and wildlife populations. A number of Minnesota's migratory bird species spend parts of their lives in the areas impacted by the spill and impacts on their populations in the state could become evident over time.

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000
Recipient
USGS
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$594,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000

There is a critical need to understand how our natural resources are already responding to climate change in order to develop tools for projecting natural resource responses into the future and to devise plans for actions that can be taken in reaction to observed and predicted changes. Phenology – the timing of seasonal biological events such as budburst, flowering, bird migration, and leaf coloring – provides a tested indicator of climate change response by plants and animals.

Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$236,000
Recipient
Benton Soil and Water Conservation District
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$431,000
Recipient
U of MN - Duluth NRRI
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$334,000
Recipient
University of St. Thomas
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$95,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$95,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN - Duluth NRRI
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$585,000

Large deposits of copper, nickel, cobalt, and other minerals in northeastern Minnesota could provide huge economic and employment benefits to the state while becoming an important source of important metals for the country. However, the mining required to extract them could have significant water quality impacts in a region that includes the Boundary Water Canoe Area Wilderness and other environmentally sensitive watersheds.

Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$320,000
Recipient
Whitewater Joint Powers Board
2009 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$52,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Recipient
DNR
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$262,000


PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$700,000
Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$148,000
Recipient
MPCA
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Project Overview

Recipient
U of MN
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000

Bees play a key role in ecosystem function and in agriculture, including more than one hundred U.S. crops either need or benefit from pollinators. However, bee pollinators are in dramatic decline in Minnesota and throughout the country. One of the potential causes appears to be a scarcity of bee-friendly flowers, particularly in urban areas, which is leading to nutritional deficiencies, chronic exposure to pesticides, and debilitating diseases and parasites.

Recipient
Minnesota Recreation and Park Association
2009 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$45,000

Overall Project Outcomes and Results
The 2004 LCMR Parks Study and the 2003-2008 State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) recommended better coordination among Minnesota's outdoor recreation providers. This project addressed these recommendations by engaging public and private outdoor recreation leaders to transform better coordination into shared knowledge and practices.

Recipient
U of MN - Duluth
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000


PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN - Duluth
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$262,000

Silver carp are migrating north up the Mississippi River and pose threats to the native fish and aquatic ecosystems of Minnesota rivers and lakes where they can become established. Additionally, the unique jumping ability of silver carp also places recreational boaters in danger of being injured during collisions with airborne fish. However, it is believed that this jumping ability could potentially be exploited as a weakness to help detect, manage, and control silver carp populations. Researchers at the University of Minnesota – Duluth, in cooperation with the U.S.

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2009 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$500,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results
Minnesota prairies reliably produce bioenergy resources which largely go untapped. This project sought management practices to promote wildlife and habitat diversity on future working prairies used for bioenergy in Minnesota. It combined harvested areas with refuges and monitored wildlife populations and bioenergy potential in Minnesota grasslands, while developing protocols for future long-term work.

Recipient
DNR
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
MN DNR
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$140,000

Garlic mustard is a non-native, invasive plant species that is severely threatening native plant communities and degrading wildlife habitat in forest and riparian zones throughout the state. The plant is considered the highest priority species for development of long-term management solutions such as biological control, which involves using natural enemies of a non-native species from its native region to control or reduce the impact of the species in the areas where they are invasive.

Recipient
Minnesota Department of Agriculture
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$447,000

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is an invasive insect that has been decimating ash trees throughout the Great Lake states and is currently advancing into Minnesota where it threatens the nearly 1 billion ash trees that occur throughout the state - the second most in any state. Loss of these trees would devastate ecosystems throughout Minnesota and have major economic impacts for the forest products industry as well as through the costs associated with treatment, removal, and replacement of lost trees.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$854,000

Invasive carp species, including silver carp and bighead carp, are migrating north up the Mississippi River and pose threats to the native fish and aquatic ecosystems of Minnesota rivers and lakes where they can become established. While individual carp have been found in Minnesota, it is not presently believed that there are established breeding populations in the state.

Recipient
Minnesota Department of Agriculture
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$99,000

Brown marmorated stink bug is a terrestrial invasive species in Minnesota that was first discovered in 2010 and has been expanding its range since. It is a generalist plant pest that attacks more than 300 species of plants in natural, agricultural, and horticultural settings and is known for its unpleasant odor, large numbers, and propensity for home invasion. Proactive management approaches are available and in development that can be used to slow and potentially control brown marmorated stink bug populations.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$167,000

Brown marmorated stink bug is a terrestrial invasive species in Minnesota that was first discovered in 2010 and has been expanding its range since. It is a generalist plant pest that attacks more than 300 species of plants in natural, agricultural, and horticultural settings and is known for its unpleasant odor, large numbers, and propensity for home invasion. Proactive management approaches are available and in development that can be used to slow and potentially control brown marmorated stink bug populations.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$74,000

On many public lands in northwest Minnesota, cattail growth has far exceeded the distribution recommended for optimum wetland wildlife habitat and a need for cattail control has become recognized. Cattails have also recently been demonstrated to have bioenergy potential.