Minnesota's Legacy

All Projects

Showing 1 - 10 of 10 | Export projects
Recipient
Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge Trust, Inc.
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$500,000
Carver
Hennepin
Le Sueur
Scott
Sibley
Recipient
The Trust for Public Land
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$750,000
Chisago
Washington
Recipient
Friends of the Mississippi River
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000

Though many parts of the Twin Cities metropolitan area are urbanized, there are also has large areas of natural lands that continue to serve as important habitat for fish, wildlife, and plant communities. However, pressure on these remaining lands continues to intensify as population and development pressures increase.

Dakota
Hennepin
Ramsey
Washington
Recipient
St. Croix River Association
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$190,000
Chisago
Washington
Recipient
Great River Greening
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Though many parts of the Twin Cities metropolitan area are urbanized, there are also has large areas of natural lands that continue to serve as important habitat for fish, wildlife, and plant communities. However, pressure on these remaining lands continues to intensify as population and development pressures increase.

Anoka
Carver
Chisago
Dakota
Goodhue
Isanti
Ramsey
Sherburne
Washington
Recipient
U.S. Geological Survey
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$455,000
Blue Earth
Carver
Dakota
Goodhue
Hennepin
Le Sueur
Nicollet
Ramsey
Scott
Sibley
Wabasha
Washington
Recipient
International Wolf Center
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$120,000

Wolves are a hot topic in Minnesota, with the public sharply divided on management issues such as wolf hunting. The complexity of the topic lends itself to a lot of misunderstanding and misinformation that is not always helpful to resolving the polarized debate.

Anoka
Carver
Dakota
Hennepin
Ramsey
Scott
Sherburne
Washington
Wright
Recipient
Prairie Woods Environmental Learning Center
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$350,000

Adoption of renewable energy technologies and energy conservation practices can contribute in a variety of ways to the environmental and economic health of rural Minnesota communities through costs savings and emissions reductions. Engaging and coaching students as the leaders in the process of implementing such practices provides the added benefit of increasing knowledge, teaching about potential career paths, and developing leadership experience.

Aitkin
Benton
Big Stone
Blue Earth
Brown
Carlton
Cass
Chippewa
Cook
Cottonwood
Crow Wing
Douglas
Faribault
Fillmore
Freeborn
Goodhue
Grant
Houston
Itasca
Jackson
Kanabec
Kandiyohi
Koochiching
Lac qui Parle
Lake
Le Sueur
Lincoln
Lyon
Martin
McLeod
Meeker
Mille Lacs
Morrison
Mower
Murray
Nicollet
Nobles
Olmsted
Otter Tail
Pine
Pipestone
Pope
Redwood
Renville
Rice
Rock
Sibley
St. Louis
Stearns
Stevens
Swift
Todd
Traverse
Wadena
Waseca
Watonwan
Wilkin
Winona
Yellow Medicine