Technology/Equipment Grant for Individual Artist

Project Details by Fiscal Year
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$417
Fund Source
Arts & Cultural Heritage Fund
Recipient
Lily Winter
Recipient Type
Individual
Status
In Progress
Start Date
May 2015
End Date
May 2020
Activity Type
Grants/Contracts
Counties Affected
Itasca
St. Louis
Crow Wing
Beltrami
Cass
Legal Citation / Subdivision
Laws of Minnesota 2013, Chapter 137, Article 4, Section 2, Subdivision 3
Appropriation Language

ACHF Arts Access ACHF Arts Education

2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$417
Other Funds Leveraged
$773
Direct expenses
$1,190
Administration costs
$0
Number of full time equivalents funded
0
Proposed Measurable Outcome(s)

Artists reach a point in their creative lives, often more than once, when they've mastered the level they're at, and are ready to advance to the next level, to take the next step. A rolling mill would give me the freedom and power to re-shape my metal, allow me to create more challenging and elaborate designs, to go from a beginner-level artist to a serious artist. It would also give me the ability to recycle my metal waste by melting it down and making it into sheets, ready for new work. A rolling mill would help me take the next step as an artist. There are several ways to evaluate my work once I begin using the rolling mill. First, is the ability to master all aspects of the rolling mill. This will be self-evident. I know what the rolling mill can do, and I will know if the work I produce with it will stand up to a basic level of scrutiny. The next step would be to get feedback from other artists, and various people in the arts community whose opinions I trust. Last, and most important, is the process of presenting your work to the public. This is the acid test. A stranger looks at your work and either approves of what they see, or they do not. I'm confident that I can master the rolling mill, I believe that people in the arts community will give me good feedback, and I'm hopeful that the public will appreciate what I create with my new tool.

Measurable Outcome(s)

As stated in my original application, there are several ways to evaluate my work once I begin using the rolling mill: First, is the ability to master all aspects of the rolling mill. This will be self-evident. I know what the rolling mill can do, and I will know if the work I produce with it will stand up to a basic level of scrutiny. The next step would be to get feedback from other artists, and various people in the arts community whose opinions I trust. Last, and most important, is the process of presenting your work to the public. This is the acid test. A stranger looks at your work and either approves of what they see, or they do not. I have had the rolling mill for a fairly short time--I am currently learning all aspects of it. Once I feel comfortable with it, I will show my work to other working artists whose opinions I trust. Finally, I will present my work to the public.

Description of Funds
Source of Additional Funds

Other, local or private

Project Overview
Technology/Equipment Grant for Individual Artist
Project Details
Rolling Mill for Advanced Metalwork in Jewelry Making. A rolling mill is a device that acts like a rolling pin on metal. At the moment I'm using mostly small hand-held tools meant for the novice jeweler. A rolling mill can texture and shape metal in ways that I can't do with my current tools. Scraps of metal can be taken from the discard pile, then melted down and rolled into sheets with a rolling mill. A rolling mill would help me advance to the next level as a jewelry artist.
Project Manager
First Name
Lily
Last Name
Winter
Organization Name
Lily Winter
State
MN
Phone
(218) 301-9816
Email
lilywinterjewelry@yahoo.com
Competitive Grant Making Body
Board Members and Qualifications
Erling Ellison: jewelry designer and creator, speech coach and judge, director of Garrison Art Fair; Ken Bloom: Director of Tweed Museum of Art, University of Minnesota-Duluth; Janeen Carey: vocalist, retired Hibbing Community College librarian and information media specialist; Kate Fitzgerald: Program Director North Shore Music Association, writer; Peter Pestalozzi: furniture maker, wood worker; David Beard: Assistant Professor University of Minnesota-Duluth writing studies; Mark King: actor, theater reviewer, musician; Adam Guggemos: graphic designer, art events promoter; Michelle Ronning: jewelry designer and maker; John Gregor: photographer, art educator, community art advocate; Ann Russ: music performer, community song leader, choir director, workshop leader, past director and founder of North Shore Music Association; Tara Makinen: Executive Director of Itasca Orchestra and Strings, musician; Dana Mattice: Development and Communications Director of The Art Institute Duluth, Shannon Sweeney: stage manager for Duluth Playhouse and former production manager for the Minnesota Ballet; Moira Villiard: visual artist and student of arts and communication at University of Wisconsin-Superior.
Advisory Group Members and Qualifications
Adam Guggemos: graphic designer, art events promoter; Michelle Ronning: jewelry designer and maker; Moira Villiard: visual artist and student of arts and communication at University of Wisconsin-Superior; John Gregor: photographer, art educator, community art advocate; Tara Makinen: Executive Director of Itasca Orchestra and Strings, musician; Dana Mattice: Development and Communications Director of The Art Institute Duluth; Janeen Carey: vocalist, retired Hibbing Community College librarian and information media specialist.