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Showing 1 - 18 of 18 | Export projects
Recipient
Minnesota Geological Survey
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$615,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$615,000
Fund Source

This project will accelerate production of County Geologic Atlases (part A). An atlas is a set of geologic maps and associated databases for a county that facilitate informed management of natural resources, especially water and minerals.

Recipient
Leech Lake Tribal College
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$23,709
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$18,911

Leech Lake Tribal College is commiteed to the goal of ensuring that Ojibwemowin remains a vital part of our culture for generations to come. This grant will play an important role in complementing that work and helping LLTC make Ojibwemowin more accessible to our community. The purpose of our grant propsal is to create more and varied learning opportunites accessible to students, staff, and community members in order to create more Ojibwemowin learners and speakers.

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$636,000

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been decimating ash throughout the Great Lake States and is currently advancing into Minnesota, threatening the future of the ash forests that occur across much of the state. Of particular concern is the impact EAB will have on the ecology and functioning of black ash swamps, which cover over one million acres in Minnesota and represent the state’s most common ash forest type. Black ash trees grow and thrive in swamps and occupy a unique wet niche where few other tree species grow.

Recipient
U of MN
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$190,000

Over 527,000 acres of unmanaged woodlands are being used for livestock grazing throughout Minnesota. Managing these grazed woodlands based on the use of best management practices can provide environmental and economic opportunities, including improved water quality, maximized forage production, and higher-quality timber. The best management practices involved are commonly used in other parts of the country with other types of ecosystems, but have not been widely adopted in Minnesota due to a lack of knowledge and experience with implementing them within the ecosystems of Minnesota.

Recipient
U of MN
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$336,000

Minnesota has 9.5 million acres of public forest lands that play an important role in sustaining Minnesota’s environment and economy. The policies and programs used by public timber sale programs can impact post-harvest ecological conditions and have pronounced effects on the composition, structure, and productivity of the forest in the future. Additionally, timber harvesting revenues play an important role in economic activity, employment, and tax revenue.

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$262,000

Minnesota has 15.9 million acres of forest land managed by a variety of county, state and federal agencies, and private landowners for timber production, wildlife habitat, and ecological considerations. Forest managers rely on inventory data to make effective planning and management decisions. Because forests are continually changing through natural and human processes, forest inventory data is periodically updated. However, doing so is an expensive and time-consuming endeavor and, as a result, much of Minnesota’s forest inventory data is currently out of date.

Recipient
University of Minnesota-Extension
2019 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$110,000
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$110,000
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$110,000
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$110,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$110,000
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$110,000
Fund Source

Funding supports an Irrigation Specialist to develop guidance and provide education on irrigation and nitrogen best management practices (BMPs). In this position, Dr. Vasu Sharma provides direct support to irrigators on issues of irrigation scheduling and soil water monitoring. She is collaborating on the development of new irrigation scheduling tools that help irrigators manage water and nitrogen resources more precisely. These tools help reduce nitrogen leaching losses in irrigated cropping systems.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000

Native to the western United States and Canada, mountain pine beetle is considered the most devastating forest insect in North America. Trees usually die as a result of infestation and an unprecedented outbreak in the west is currently decimating pine forests there. While mountain pine beetle is not presently believed to reside in Minnesota, there are risks posed by an expanding species range resulting from warming climate and the potential for accidental introduction via lumber imports from infested areas.

Recipient
Saint John's University AKA Saint John's University Fine Arts Programming
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$21,706
Operating Support
Recipient
College of Saint Benedict AKA College of Saint Benedict Fine Arts Programming
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$40,570
Operating Support
Recipient
Saint John's University AKA Saint John's University Fine Arts Programming
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$20,198
Operating Support
Recipient
College of Saint Benedict AKA College of Saint Benedict Fine Arts Programming
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$39,435
Operating Support
Recipient
College of Saint Benedict AKA College of Saint Benedict Fine Arts Programming
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$39,708
Operating Support
Recipient
Saint John's University AKA Saint John's University Fine Arts Programming
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$22,856
Operating Support
Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$815,000
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000

Sandhill cranes have expanded their range in Minnesota and elsewhere and as populations have expanded several states, including Minnesota, have initiated sandhill crane hunting seasons and other states are considering doing the same. Partially this is in response to increasing complaints of crop degradation by sandhill cranes.