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Recipient
Minnesota Geological Survey
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$305,000
Fund Source

This project will accelerate production of County Geologic Atlases (part A). This is a set of geologic maps and associated databases for a county that facilitate informed management of natural resources, especially water and minerals.

Recipient
Minnesota Geological Survey
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$615,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$615,000
Fund Source

This project will accelerate production of County Geologic Atlases (part A). An atlas is a set of geologic maps and associated databases for a county that facilitate informed management of natural resources, especially water and minerals.

Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$301,000
Recipient
U of MN
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,800,000
Fund Source

Aquatic invasive species pose critical ecological and economic challenges for the entire state and beyond. They can cause irreparable harm to fisheries and aquatic habitat as well as damage to infrastructure. The problems posed by aquatic invasive species continue to grow as existing infestations expand and new exotic species arrive, most of which are poorly understood. New ideas and approaches are needed to develop real solutions.

Recipient
U of MN - MAISRC
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$8,700,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$4,350,000

Aquatic invasive species pose critical ecological and economic challenges for the entire state and beyond. They can cause irreparable harm to fisheries and aquatic habitat as well as damage to infrastructure. The problems posed by aquatic invasive species continue to grow as existing infestations expand and new exotic species arrive, most of which are poorly understood. New ideas and approaches are needed to develop real solutions.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Through various means, human produced chemicals can make their way into surface waters where they can have adverse effects on the function of ecological communities. Of particular concern are antibiotics and other antimicrobial substances because they have the potential to create increased antibiotic resistance. While there is a background level of naturally occurring antibiotic resistance in the natural world, elevated or persistent levels caused by human activities have the potential to harm human, animal, and overall ecosystem health.

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,000,000

The legislature granted the University of Minnesota $2,000,000 from the LCCMR to start an Aquatic Invasive Species Cooperative Research Center to address and solve aquatic invasive species (AIS) problems in the state. The University will use this initial funding to establish the administrative structure for this center, establish and renovate its facilities, start studies of Asian carp biology designed to control this species, and develop work plans for the LCCMR to ensure continuing funding for the center.

Recipient
U of MN - MAISRC
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,700,000
Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000
Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$236,000
Recipient
U of MN - Duluth NRRI
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$334,000
Recipient
U of MN - Duluth NRRI
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$585,000

Large deposits of copper, nickel, cobalt, and other minerals in northeastern Minnesota could provide huge economic and employment benefits to the state while becoming an important source of important metals for the country. However, the mining required to extract them could have significant water quality impacts in a region that includes the Boundary Water Canoe Area Wilderness and other environmentally sensitive watersheds.

Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$320,000
Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$148,000
Recipient
U of MN - Duluth
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$262,000

Silver carp are migrating north up the Mississippi River and pose threats to the native fish and aquatic ecosystems of Minnesota rivers and lakes where they can become established. Additionally, the unique jumping ability of silver carp also places recreational boaters in danger of being injured during collisions with airborne fish. However, it is believed that this jumping ability could potentially be exploited as a weakness to help detect, manage, and control silver carp populations. Researchers at the University of Minnesota – Duluth, in cooperation with the U.S.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$854,000

Invasive carp species, including silver carp and bighead carp, are migrating north up the Mississippi River and pose threats to the native fish and aquatic ecosystems of Minnesota rivers and lakes where they can become established. While individual carp have been found in Minnesota, it is not presently believed that there are established breeding populations in the state.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$400,000

Minnesota ranks #2 in hog production and #1 in sugar beet production in the U.S., generating about 11 million tons of pig manure and over one million tons of sugar processing wastes annually. Presently there are not cost-effective methods available to deal with these waste streams other than land application, which usually results in nutrient runoff into ground and surface water resources.

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Common carp, introduced from eastern Europe over a century ago, are an invasive species in Minnesota that adversely affect water quality and aquatic communities, particularly in shallow lakes and wetlands. While solutions for suppressing common carp reproduction and abundance are emerging, controlling the movement of common carp, and therefore preventing reinfestation, has so far proved difficult.

Recipient
University of Minnesota - MN Geological Survey
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$820,000

The Minnesota County Geologic Atlas program is an ongoing effort begun in 1982 that is being conducted jointly by the University of Minnesota's Minnesota Geological Survey and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The program collects information on the geology of Minnesota to create maps and reports depicting the characteristics and pollution sensitivity of Minnesota's ground-water resources.

Recipient
Minnesota Geological Survey
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,130,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
University of Minnesota - MN Geological Survey
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$600,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$600,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN - MN Geological Survey
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,200,000

The Minnesota County Geologic Atlas program is an ongoing effort begun in 1979 that is being conducted jointly by the University of Minnesota’s Minnesota Geological Survey and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR). This portion, called Part A and conducted by the Minnesota Geological Survey, collects geologic information to produce maps and databases that define aquifer boundaries and the connection of aquifers to the land surface and surface water resources.

Recipient
U of MN - Duluth
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$600,000

Lake Superior, the world’s largest freshwater lake by surface area, is amongst Minnesota’s greatest natural resources providing drinking water, shipping, recreation, and tourism. Recently the lake has been undergoing significant changes including increasing water temperatures, decreasing ice cover, increasing nutrient loads, decreasing biological productivity, increasing invasive species, and changes in species abundance and distribution. The reasons behind these changes and the interactions amongst them are not well understood.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$500,000

Wastewater treatment plants discharge effluent that contains contaminants of emerging concern, such as estrogens. Estrogens have been shown to cause ecological effects such as fish feminization and fish population collapses. Presently the treatment and discharge of estrogens into the environment via wastewater treatment is not regulated. However, it has been found that the extent of estrogen discharge from wastewater treatment correlates with how and how well nitrogen, which currently is regulated and will likely be more so in the future, is removed during the treatment process.

Recipient
University of Minnesota - Duluth
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$125,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$125,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$80,000

Over the last decade, a parasitic disease, Heterosporosis, has spread to infect fish in at least 20 water bodies in Minnesota. The parasite infects a number of economically important fish, making them inedible. As the disease can currently only be detected in its late stages, little is known about how it is transmitted and how best to control it.

Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$500,000
Recipient
U of MN
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$246,000

Waste streams often contain unutilized resources that if properly extracted or otherwise utilized could be used to provide additional sources of renewable energy or other benefits. Wastewater is one of the primary candidate waste streams because of its nutrient content and researchers have been developing technologies such as microbial fuel cells and algal-based biofuel production in order make use of these nutrients.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$279,000

Many types of bacteria perform critical ecological functions, such as cycling carbon and other nutrients, which enable life to exist. In fact, humans harness these types of bacteria in certain engineered systems, such as wastewater treatment plants and landfills, to provide various benefits such as protecting surface waters from excess nitrogen, decomposing solid waste, and treating wastewater.

Recipient
University of Minnesota Water Resources Center
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$750,000
Fund Source
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$278,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$279,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN - Duluth NRRI
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$416,000
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$180,000

Because Minnesota is at the juncture of three distinct types of ecosystems - western prairie, northern coniferous forest, and eastern deciduous forest - the region is particularly sensitive to changes in climate conditions. Understanding how the plants, animals, and waterways of Minnesota might respond to these changes will help the state plan for and manage the potential impacts. The University of Minnesota's Department of Forestry is using this appropriation to analyze past climate conditions in Minnesota and make estimates pertaining to changes expected in the foreseeable future.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Rainfall runoff in urban areas contributes to localized flooding and washes contaminants and excess nutrients downstream affecting water quality. Systems to mitigate these problems can be challenging to implement in urban areas due to existing infrastructure and competing demands for land use. However, one option is to find alternative applications for the excess rainwater and use it replace the potable water that is currently being used for certain purposes. Researchers at the University of Minnesota are using this appropriation to evaluate alternative uses for captured rainwater.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$291,000

Pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and agricultural nutrients serve important functions in crop production and the treatment of disease. However, these chemicals become pollutants when discharged into surface waters through wastewater, storm water, and agricultural runoff. There are natural processes, though, that help break down and remove these pollutants from water. One such process is the role that sunlight interacting with dissolved organic matter naturally present in surface water from decaying plant materials and algae has in transforming these contaminants.

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000

Native trout require clean, cold water that usually originates from springs, but the springs feeding the 173 designated trout streams in southeastern Minnesota are under increasing pressure from current and expected changes in land use. This joint effort by the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is working to identify and map the springs and the areas that feed water to these springs and to learn how these waters might be affected by development and water use.

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$327,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$90,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$90,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$380,000

As people use antibiotics and products containing antibacterial substances the bacteria that are resistant to the effects of these products survive and reproduce, thus creating a selection for antibiotic resistant bacteria. Many of these bacteria and the antibacterial substances ultimately make their way into the waste stream and are mixed together and concentrated at wastewater treatment plants, where they interact and can create further selection for organisms with antibiotic resistance to multiple antibacterial substances resulting in what are commonly known as “super bugs”.