All Projects

Showing 1 - 40 of 104 | Export projects
Recipient
BWSR
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$313,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$312,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN - MAISRC
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$8,700,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$4,350,000

Aquatic invasive species pose critical ecological and economic challenges for the entire state and beyond. They can cause irreparable harm to fisheries and aquatic habitat as well as damage to infrastructure. The problems posed by aquatic invasive species continue to grow as existing infestations expand and new exotic species arrive, most of which are poorly understood. New ideas and approaches are needed to develop real solutions.

Recipient
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Division of Ecological and Water Resources
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,177,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,513,000

To address the problems caused by invasive species, the 1991 Minnesota Legislature directed the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to establish the Invasive Species Program. The program is designed to implement actions to prevent the spread of invasive species and manage invasive aquatic plants and wild animals (Minnesota Statutes 84D).
The three primary goals of the DNR Invasive Species Program are to:
1. Prevent the introduction of new invasive species into Minnesota.
2. Prevent the spread of invasive species within Minnesota.

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,000,000

The legislature granted the University of Minnesota $2,000,000 from the LCCMR to start an Aquatic Invasive Species Cooperative Research Center to address and solve aquatic invasive species (AIS) problems in the state. The University will use this initial funding to establish the administrative structure for this center, establish and renovate its facilities, start studies of Asian carp biology designed to control this species, and develop work plans for the LCCMR to ensure continuing funding for the center.

Recipient
U of MN - MAISRC
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,700,000
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000

There is a critical need to understand how our natural resources are already responding to climate change in order to develop tools for projecting natural resource responses into the future and to devise plans for actions that can be taken in reaction to observed and predicted changes. Phenology – the timing of seasonal biological events such as budburst, flowering, bird migration, and leaf coloring – provides a tested indicator of climate change response by plants and animals.

Recipient
Benton Soil and Water Conservation District
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$431,000
Recipient
U of MN
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000

Bees play a key role in ecosystem function and in agriculture, including more than one hundred U.S. crops either need or benefit from pollinators. However, bee pollinators are in dramatic decline in Minnesota and throughout the country. One of the potential causes appears to be a scarcity of bee-friendly flowers, particularly in urban areas, which is leading to nutritional deficiencies, chronic exposure to pesticides, and debilitating diseases and parasites.

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$75,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$75,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
Metro Blooms
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$279,000

Project Overview

Recipient
Great River Greening
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$524,000
Recipient
Wilderness Inquiry
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,200,000
Recipient
MN DNR
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
MN DNR
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000

The purchase of conservation easements—restrictions on land use that protect natural features while keeping land in private ownership—has proven to be an effective means to protect land at a lower initial cost than full state ownership. However, once an easement is purchased there are ongoing stewardship, monitoring, and enforcement responsibilities necessary to ensure the terms of the agreement between the easement holder and the landowner are met.

Recipient
Board of Water and Soil Resources
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$3,000,000

Enrollment of private lands in conservation programs can provide important natural resource and other public benefits by taking the lands out of production so that they can provide various wildlife, water quality, and ecological benefits. This appropriation is enabling the Minnesota Board of Soil and Water Resources to continue to provide grants to local soil and water conservation districts for employment of technical staff to assist private landowners in implementing conservation programs.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$350,000

Though they are a relatively unnoticed group of species, native freshwater mussels are a critical part of river ecosystems because they provide a variety of important functions including improved water clarity, enhanced streambed stability, reduced downstream transport of contaminants, and creation of habitat for other aquatic life. However, mussel populations in Minnesota have declined in recent decades as a result of habitat destruction, pollution, land-use change, over-harvesting, and the introduction of exotic species.

Recipient
MN DNR
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$88,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$87,000


PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
MN DNR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$158,000

Appropriations to non-state entities must be made through a formal contract with a state entity that manages all of the funds for the project on a reimbursement basis. This appropriation to Minnesota's Department of Natural Resources (DNR) funds the expenses incurred by the DNR in contracting, contract management, and expense re-imbursement for most of the Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund appropriations made to non-state entities, including new projects funded during the biennium and existing projects funded in previous bienniums.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,000,000

Each year Minnesota municipal wastewater treatment plants generate large amounts of oily scum, concentrated liquid called centrate, and sludge. These waste streams are disposed of either in landfills or by burning or subjected to additional treatment. However, new technologies have shown potential to capture resource values from these waste products while lowering the treatment costs for these waste streams.

Recipient
Headwaters Science Center
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$121,000
Recipient
MN DNR
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$416,000

Minnesota’s natural resource professional workforce is much less diverse than its citizenry and many other professional fields. The benefits of a more diverse workforce are many, including the ability of organizations to increase innovation and creativity, attract higher qualified candidate pools, and ensure services that meet the diverse interests and needs of all citizens.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$84,000

Minnesota’s natural resource professional workforce is much less diverse than its citizenry and many other professional fields. The benefits of a more diverse workforce are many, including the ability of organizations to increase innovation and creativity, attract higher qualified candidate pools, and ensure services that meet the diverse interests and needs of all citizens.

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$550,000


PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
Chippewa River Watershed Project
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$247,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
Will Steger Foundation
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$325,000

Climate change has and will have profound effects on Minnesota’s economy, agriculture, tourism, and natural resources. While climate change is often discussed in the broader contexts of its potential impacts at a national or international level, research has shown that climate change education and behavior change happens more effectively when the issue is made local and relevant.

Recipient
Center for Energy and Environment
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,000,000

Increasing energy conservation and efficiency in residences can play a significant role in Minnesota's goals for energy savings and carbon emissions reductions. The Center for Energy and Environment (CEE), a Minneapolis-based nonprofit organization, is using this appropriation to develop and implement innovative residential energy efficiency programs. Programs will be demonstrated in eight cities: Apple Valley, Austin, Duluth, Minneapolis, Owatonna, Park Rapids, Rochester, and St. Paul.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$864,000

Pollinators play a key role in ecosystem function and in agriculture, including thousands of native plants and more than one hundred U.S. crops that either need or benefit from pollinators. However, pollinators are in dramatic decline in Minnesota and throughout the country. The causes of the decline are not completely understood, but identified factors include loss of nesting sites, fewer flowers, increased disease, and increased pesticide use. Fortunately, there are known actions that can be taken to help counteract some of these factors.

Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$270,000
Recipient
MN Wildflowers Information
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000

The average Minnesotan and even most natural resource managers are not skilled in plant identification, yet the ability to positively identify plants is crucial to a number of conservation activities, including identifying areas that need protection, recognizing new or existing invasive species, monitoring restoration projects, and delineating wetlands. The Minnesota Wildflowers project attempts to fill this need with a free web-based field guide ultimately aimed at providing profiles for each of the over 2,100 vascular plant species in Minnesota.

Recipient
Hennepin County
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
Farmers Legal Action Group, Inc.
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$100,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
MPCA
2009 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$750,000

Project Outcome and Results
Minnesota Schools Cutting Carbon (MnSCC) is a three-year project that engaged over 7,000 students in 100 public high schools, colleges and universities across Minnesota to save energy, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions at their schools.

Recipient
National Eagle Center
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$30,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$30,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$838,000

The Soudan Iron Mine near Ely, Minnesota is no longer an active mine and is now part of a state park, as well as the home to a state-of-the-art physics laboratory at the bottom of the mine. The mine has also been discovered to contain an extreme environment in the form of an ancient and very salty brine bubbling up from a half-mile below the Earth’s surface through holes drilled when the mine was active. Strange microorganisms – part of an ecosystem never before characterized by science – have been found living in the brine.

Recipient
MN DNR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$75,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Recipient
UMD, NRRI
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$507,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
MN DNR
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$245,000

With only 1% of Minnesota’s native prairie remaining, many prairie plant and animal species have dramatically declined. Of the 12 butterfly species native to Minnesota prairies, two species, the Poweshiek skipperling and the Dakota skipper, have already largely disappeared from the state and are proposed for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act despite being historically among the most common prairie butterflies and having their historic ranges concentrated in Minnesota.

Recipient
Minnesota Zoological Garden
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$380,000

With only 1% of Minnesota’s native prairie remaining, many prairie plant and animal species have dramatically declined. Of the 12 butterfly species native to Minnesota prairies, two species, the Poweshiek skipperling and the Dakota skipper, have already largely disappeared from the state and are proposed for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act despite being historically among the most common prairie butterflies and having their historic ranges concentrated in Minnesota.

Recipient
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$800,000
Recipient
MN DNR
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$487,000