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Recipient
U of MN
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,800,000
Fund Source

Aquatic invasive species pose critical ecological and economic challenges for the entire state and beyond. They can cause irreparable harm to fisheries and aquatic habitat as well as damage to infrastructure. The problems posed by aquatic invasive species continue to grow as existing infestations expand and new exotic species arrive, most of which are poorly understood. New ideas and approaches are needed to develop real solutions.

Recipient
U of MN - MAISRC
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$8,700,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$4,350,000

Aquatic invasive species pose critical ecological and economic challenges for the entire state and beyond. They can cause irreparable harm to fisheries and aquatic habitat as well as damage to infrastructure. The problems posed by aquatic invasive species continue to grow as existing infestations expand and new exotic species arrive, most of which are poorly understood. New ideas and approaches are needed to develop real solutions.

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,000,000

The legislature granted the University of Minnesota $2,000,000 from the LCCMR to start an Aquatic Invasive Species Cooperative Research Center to address and solve aquatic invasive species (AIS) problems in the state. The University will use this initial funding to establish the administrative structure for this center, establish and renovate its facilities, start studies of Asian carp biology designed to control this species, and develop work plans for the LCCMR to ensure continuing funding for the center.

Recipient
U of MN - MAISRC
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,700,000
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000

There is a critical need to understand how our natural resources are already responding to climate change in order to develop tools for projecting natural resource responses into the future and to devise plans for actions that can be taken in reaction to observed and predicted changes. Phenology – the timing of seasonal biological events such as budburst, flowering, bird migration, and leaf coloring – provides a tested indicator of climate change response by plants and animals.

Recipient
U of MN
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000

Bees play a key role in ecosystem function and in agriculture, including more than one hundred U.S. crops either need or benefit from pollinators. However, bee pollinators are in dramatic decline in Minnesota and throughout the country. One of the potential causes appears to be a scarcity of bee-friendly flowers, particularly in urban areas, which is leading to nutritional deficiencies, chronic exposure to pesticides, and debilitating diseases and parasites.

Recipient
U of MN - Duluth
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$262,000

Silver carp are migrating north up the Mississippi River and pose threats to the native fish and aquatic ecosystems of Minnesota rivers and lakes where they can become established. Additionally, the unique jumping ability of silver carp also places recreational boaters in danger of being injured during collisions with airborne fish. However, it is believed that this jumping ability could potentially be exploited as a weakness to help detect, manage, and control silver carp populations. Researchers at the University of Minnesota – Duluth, in cooperation with the U.S.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$854,000

Invasive carp species, including silver carp and bighead carp, are migrating north up the Mississippi River and pose threats to the native fish and aquatic ecosystems of Minnesota rivers and lakes where they can become established. While individual carp have been found in Minnesota, it is not presently believed that there are established breeding populations in the state.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$167,000

Brown marmorated stink bug is a terrestrial invasive species in Minnesota that was first discovered in 2010 and has been expanding its range since. It is a generalist plant pest that attacks more than 300 species of plants in natural, agricultural, and horticultural settings and is known for its unpleasant odor, large numbers, and propensity for home invasion. Proactive management approaches are available and in development that can be used to slow and potentially control brown marmorated stink bug populations.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$74,000

On many public lands in northwest Minnesota, cattail growth has far exceeded the distribution recommended for optimum wetland wildlife habitat and a need for cattail control has become recognized. Cattails have also recently been demonstrated to have bioenergy potential.

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$75,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$75,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
Central Lakes College
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$75,000
Recipient
U of MN - Duluth NRRI
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Mine stockpiles are unproductive due to soil deficiencies of organic matter, nutrients, and soil organisms, which are essential to supporting healthy plant growth, diversity, and succession. Waste products, including biosolids, composts, and dredged materials, have the potential to be used to address some of these deficiencies and make the lands productive again.

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$550,000


PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$864,000

Pollinators play a key role in ecosystem function and in agriculture, including thousands of native plants and more than one hundred U.S. crops that either need or benefit from pollinators. However, pollinators are in dramatic decline in Minnesota and throughout the country. The causes of the decline are not completely understood, but identified factors include loss of nesting sites, fewer flowers, increased disease, and increased pesticide use. Fortunately, there are known actions that can be taken to help counteract some of these factors.

Recipient
U of MN - St. Anthony Falls Laboratory
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$294,000
Recipient
U of MN - Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$388,000
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN - Landscape Arboretum
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,000,000

The University of Minnesota’s Landscape Arboretum is the largest and most diverse horticultural site in Minnesota. It features gardens and natural areas representative of Minnesota and the upper-Midwest that can be explored using several miles of trails. Additionally it conducts fruit and plant breeding research to develop cultivars that have particular desired characteristics, such as cold hardiness or disease resistance. The arboretum has a long-term goal of protecting the entire watershed of which it is a part.

Recipient
University of MN
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,000,000
Fund Source

The Arboretum, consistent with the priorities of the LSOHC, successfully purchased 78.13 acres in Victoria, Minnesota adjacent to Arboretum property.  The purchase will ensure the protection of the deepest lake in Carver County and valuable habitat for future generations.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,460,000

Terrestrial invasive species are species that are not native to a location and that pose critical ecological and economic challenges once they become established in that location. They come in the form of plants, animals, insects, pathogens, and microbes that can cause harm to natural habitat, urban landscapes, and agricultural systems. The problems posed by terrestrial invasive species continue to grow as existing infestations expand and new exotic species arrive, many of which are poorly understood.

Recipient
U of MN - Duluth NRRI
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000

Moose, one of Minnesota’s most iconic wildlife species, are dying at increasingly higher rates in Minnesota and there is uncertainty as to why. Estimates suggest the population declined 35 percent just between 2012 to 2013, and projections suggest moose could be nearly gone from the state by 2020 if this trend is not halted and, ideally, reversed.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000

Native to the western United States and Canada, mountain pine beetle is considered the most devastating forest insect in North America. Trees usually die as a result of infestation and an unprecedented outbreak in the west is currently decimating pine forests there. While mountain pine beetle is not presently believed to reside in Minnesota, there are risks posed by an expanding species range resulting from warming climate and the potential for accidental introduction via lumber imports from infested areas.

Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$815,000
Recipient
U of MN - Landscape Arboretum
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$615,000

Pollinators play a key role in ecosystem function and in agriculture, including thousands of native plants and more than one hundred U.S. crops that either need or benefit from pollinators. However, pollinators are in dramatic decline in Minnesota and throughout the country. The causes of the decline are not completely understood, but identified factors include loss of nesting sites, fewer flowers, increased disease, and increased pesticide use. Developing an aware, informed citizenry that understands this issue is one key to finding and implementing solutions to counteract these factors.

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000


PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
University of Minnesota - NRRI
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000

Earthworms are common throughout much of Minnesota, but few realize that they are not native to the state and were in fact introduced from Europe and Asia. Earthworms are invasive in Minnesota and have been shown to have large and potentially irreversible impacts on hardwood forest biodiversity and regeneration. As dispersal by human actions is the primary means of introduction and spread of invasive earthworms, there exists great potential to arrest the current spread of earthworms already present and prevent the introduction of additional species.

Recipient
U of MN - Duluth NRRI
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$416,000
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$180,000

Because Minnesota is at the juncture of three distinct types of ecosystems - western prairie, northern coniferous forest, and eastern deciduous forest - the region is particularly sensitive to changes in climate conditions. Understanding how the plants, animals, and waterways of Minnesota might respond to these changes will help the state plan for and manage the potential impacts. The University of Minnesota's Department of Forestry is using this appropriation to analyze past climate conditions in Minnesota and make estimates pertaining to changes expected in the foreseeable future.

Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$400,000
Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$144,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000

Ecological restorations aim to aid the recovery of native ecosystems that have been degraded or lost. However, very seldom are restorations evaluated past the initial implementation phase to determine whether the efforts achieved their goals and the funds spent were a strategic conservation investment. Monitoring and evaluation of restorations can teach what works and what does not in order to advance restoration practices and increase the likelihood of success for future projects.

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$545,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000

Native trout require clean, cold water that usually originates from springs, but the springs feeding the 173 designated trout streams in southeastern Minnesota are under increasing pressure from current and expected changes in land use. This joint effort by the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is working to identify and map the springs and the areas that feed water to these springs and to learn how these waters might be affected by development and water use.

Recipient
BWSR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$107,000

An emerging practice called "precision conservation" aims to maximize conservation benefits by considering the value of lands in terms of the interconnected systems of which they are a part. By compiling and integrating multiple types of data layers and analysis that are available today, conservation professionals can use the best and most precise information available to identify, prioritize, and guide conservation efforts.

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$327,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$90,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$90,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$140,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$140,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW