All Projects

Showing 1 - 7 of 7 | Export projects
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$75,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$75,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
National Eagle Center
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$30,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$30,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
Minnesota Land Trust
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$20,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$20,000

The Minnesota Land Trust provides coordination, mapping, and data management for the Metropolitan Conservation Corridors partnership. Funds are being used to coordinate the partnership, guide strategic outreach and implementation efforts, manage project data, and provide reporting and mapping of accomplishments.

Recipient
MN DNR
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,125,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,125,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
MN DNR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,100,000

The Minnesota County Biological Survey (MCBS) is an ongoing effort begun in 1987 by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) that is systematically surveying, county-by-county, the state's natural habitats. The effort identifies significant natural areas and collects and interprets data on the status, distribution, and ecology of plants, animals, and native plant communities throughout the state. Through 2009 surveys have been completed in 74 of Minnesota's 87 counties and have added nearly 17,000 new records of rare features to the DNR's information systems.

Recipient
University of Minnesota - NRRI
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000

Earthworms are common throughout much of Minnesota, but few realize that they are not native to the state and were in fact introduced from Europe and Asia. Earthworms are invasive in Minnesota and have been shown to have large and potentially irreversible impacts on hardwood forest biodiversity and regeneration. As dispersal by human actions is the primary means of introduction and spread of invasive earthworms, there exists great potential to arrest the current spread of earthworms already present and prevent the introduction of additional species.

Recipient
BWSR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$107,000

An emerging practice called "precision conservation" aims to maximize conservation benefits by considering the value of lands in terms of the interconnected systems of which they are a part. By compiling and integrating multiple types of data layers and analysis that are available today, conservation professionals can use the best and most precise information available to identify, prioritize, and guide conservation efforts.