All Projects

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Recipient
Minnesota State University, Mankato
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$69,438
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$260,324
Fund Source

This project goal is to conduct water chemistry monitoring at seventeen stream locations, to record and submit all data collected through this process, and to provide the information necessary for the calculation of water quality pollutant loads using the FLUX32 program.

Recipient
Minnesota Geological Survey
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$615,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$615,000
Fund Source

This project will accelerate production of County Geologic Atlases (part A). An atlas is a set of geologic maps and associated databases for a county that facilitate informed management of natural resources, especially water and minerals.

Recipient
Rock County Community Library (Plum Creek Library System)
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$9,285
To purchase a microfilm reader/printer to make microfilmed records more accessible to the public.
Recipient
Pine City Library Foundation
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$9,385
To purchase a microfilm reader/printer to make microfilmed records more accessible to the public.
Recipient
Virginia Public Library
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$9,385
To purchase a microfilm reader/printer to make microfilmed records more accessible to the public.
Recipient
Hutchinson Public Library
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$7,385
To purchase a microfilm reader/printer to broaden public accessibility to microfilmed records.
Recipient
U of MN - MAISRC
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$8,700,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$4,350,000

Aquatic invasive species pose critical ecological and economic challenges for the entire state and beyond. They can cause irreparable harm to fisheries and aquatic habitat as well as damage to infrastructure. The problems posed by aquatic invasive species continue to grow as existing infestations expand and new exotic species arrive, most of which are poorly understood. New ideas and approaches are needed to develop real solutions.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Through various means, human produced chemicals can make their way into surface waters where they can have adverse effects on the function of ecological communities. Of particular concern are antibiotics and other antimicrobial substances because they have the potential to create increased antibiotic resistance. While there is a background level of naturally occurring antibiotic resistance in the natural world, elevated or persistent levels caused by human activities have the potential to harm human, animal, and overall ecosystem health.

Recipient
Arrowhead Library System
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$261,461
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$261,461

Minnesota’s 12 regional public library systems, which encompass 350 public libraries in all areas of the state, benefit from a portion of the Legacy Amendment’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund. Through State Library Services, a division of the Minnesota Department of Education, each regional public library system receives a formula-driven allocation from the annual $3 million Minnesota Regional Library Legacy Grant.

Recipient
The College of Saint Scholastica
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$4,800
Art Project Grant
Recipient
Bemidji Public Library
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$6,000
Arts/Cultural Heritage Grant
Recipient
East Grand Forks Campbell Library
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$10,000
Arts Legacy Grant
Recipient
University of Saint Thomas
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$25,647
Arts Tour Minnesota
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000

There is a critical need to understand how our natural resources are already responding to climate change in order to develop tools for projecting natural resource responses into the future and to devise plans for actions that can be taken in reaction to observed and predicted changes. Phenology – the timing of seasonal biological events such as budburst, flowering, bird migration, and leaf coloring – provides a tested indicator of climate change response by plants and animals.

Recipient
U of MN - Duluth
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$262,000

Silver carp are migrating north up the Mississippi River and pose threats to the native fish and aquatic ecosystems of Minnesota rivers and lakes where they can become established. Additionally, the unique jumping ability of silver carp also places recreational boaters in danger of being injured during collisions with airborne fish. However, it is believed that this jumping ability could potentially be exploited as a weakness to help detect, manage, and control silver carp populations. Researchers at the University of Minnesota – Duluth, in cooperation with the U.S.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$854,000

Invasive carp species, including silver carp and bighead carp, are migrating north up the Mississippi River and pose threats to the native fish and aquatic ecosystems of Minnesota rivers and lakes where they can become established. While individual carp have been found in Minnesota, it is not presently believed that there are established breeding populations in the state.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$167,000

Brown marmorated stink bug is a terrestrial invasive species in Minnesota that was first discovered in 2010 and has been expanding its range since. It is a generalist plant pest that attacks more than 300 species of plants in natural, agricultural, and horticultural settings and is known for its unpleasant odor, large numbers, and propensity for home invasion. Proactive management approaches are available and in development that can be used to slow and potentially control brown marmorated stink bug populations.

Recipient
St. Cloud State University
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$9,996
To hire a qualified archaeologist to conduct a survey of four archaeological sites to determine dates of earliest human occupation.
Recipient
Minnesota State University, Mankato (Department of Anthropology)
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$8,770
To provide better organization of archaeological collections, allowing for greater public access to historic resources.
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$74,000

On many public lands in northwest Minnesota, cattail growth has far exceeded the distribution recommended for optimum wetland wildlife habitat and a need for cattail control has become recognized. Cattails have also recently been demonstrated to have bioenergy potential.

Recipient
Funding is awarded to projects selected by the evaluation committee. This is a competitive process.
2019 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$662,000
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$663,000
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$787,000
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$788,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,100,000
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,000,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,050,000
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,050,000
Fund Source

The  goals of the program are to evaluate the effectiveness of agricultural conservation practices, identify underlying processes that affect water quality, and develop technologies to target critical areas of the landscape. Funded projects provide current and accurate scientific data on the environmental impacts of agricultural practices and help to develop or revise agricultural practices that reduce environmental impacts while maintaining farm profitability.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$400,000

Minnesota ranks #2 in hog production and #1 in sugar beet production in the U.S., generating about 11 million tons of pig manure and over one million tons of sugar processing wastes annually. Presently there are not cost-effective methods available to deal with these waste streams other than land application, which usually results in nutrient runoff into ground and surface water resources.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$350,000

Though they are a relatively unnoticed group of species, native freshwater mussels are a critical part of river ecosystems because they provide a variety of important functions including improved water clarity, enhanced streambed stability, reduced downstream transport of contaminants, and creation of habitat for other aquatic life. However, mussel populations in Minnesota have declined in recent decades as a result of habitat destruction, pollution, land-use change, over-harvesting, and the introduction of exotic species.

Recipient
University of Minnesota Office of Sponsored Projects Administration (SPA)
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$145,000
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$145,000
Fund Source

The goal of this project is to develop a core team of wastewater professionals and academics engaged in understanding and solving wastewater-related problems in Minnesota, with national relevance. The team will promote the use of new technology, designs and practices to address existing and emerging wastewater treatement challenges, including the treatement of wastewater for reuse and the emergence of new and unregulated contaminants.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,000,000

Each year Minnesota municipal wastewater treatment plants generate large amounts of oily scum, concentrated liquid called centrate, and sludge. These waste streams are disposed of either in landfills or by burning or subjected to additional treatment. However, new technologies have shown potential to capture resource values from these waste products while lowering the treatment costs for these waste streams.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$84,000

Minnesota’s natural resource professional workforce is much less diverse than its citizenry and many other professional fields. The benefits of a more diverse workforce are many, including the ability of organizations to increase innovation and creativity, attract higher qualified candidate pools, and ensure services that meet the diverse interests and needs of all citizens.

Recipient
U of MN - Duluth NRRI
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Mine stockpiles are unproductive due to soil deficiencies of organic matter, nutrients, and soil organisms, which are essential to supporting healthy plant growth, diversity, and succession. Waste products, including biosolids, composts, and dredged materials, have the potential to be used to address some of these deficiencies and make the lands productive again.

Recipient
East Central Regional Library
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$130,404
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$130,404

Minnesota’s 12 regional public library systems, which encompass 350 public libraries in all areas of the state, benefit from a portion of the Legacy Amendment’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund. Through State Library Services, a division of the Minnesota Department of Education, each regional public library system receives a formula-driven allocation from the annual $3 million Minnesota Regional Library Legacy Grant.

Recipient
Regents of the University of Minnesota (Institute on Community Integration)
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$7,965
To hire qualified professionals to edit a manuscript on the Evelyn Deno anthology.
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$864,000

Pollinators play a key role in ecosystem function and in agriculture, including thousands of native plants and more than one hundred U.S. crops that either need or benefit from pollinators. However, pollinators are in dramatic decline in Minnesota and throughout the country. The causes of the decline are not completely understood, but identified factors include loss of nesting sites, fewer flowers, increased disease, and increased pesticide use. Fortunately, there are known actions that can be taken to help counteract some of these factors.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$500,000

Wastewater treatment plants discharge effluent that contains contaminants of emerging concern, such as estrogens. Estrogens have been shown to cause ecological effects such as fish feminization and fish population collapses. Presently the treatment and discharge of estrogens into the environment via wastewater treatment is not regulated. However, it has been found that the extent of estrogen discharge from wastewater treatment correlates with how and how well nitrogen, which currently is regulated and will likely be more so in the future, is removed during the treatment process.

Recipient
Hamline University
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$39,818
Folk and Traditional Arts
Recipient
Comfort Lake Forest Lake Watershed District
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$52,500
Fund Source

The focus of this project will be on protection efforts to maintain or improve the water quality of Forest Lake by reducing phosphorus loads to the lake, especially from storm water. The two main objectives of this project are to compile and make minor updates to a large body of diagnostic work that already exists for Forest Lake, and to develop a comprehensive, site-specific implementation plan for best management practices (BMPs).

Recipient
St. Cloud State University
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$9,867
To hire a qualified archaeologist to conduct a survey in an attempt to locate Fort Fair Haven.
Recipient
Hennepin County Library
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$5,100
To hire professional conservators to assess historically significant collections and write a long range preservation plan.
Recipient
Great River Regional Library
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,097
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,097

Minnesota’s 12 regional public library systems, which encompass 350 public libraries in all areas of the state, benefit from a portion of the Legacy Amendment’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund. Through State Library Services, a division of the Minnesota Department of Education, each regional public library system receives a formula-driven allocation from the annual $3 million Minnesota Regional Library Legacy Grant.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Moose, one of Minnesota's prized wildlife species, are dying at much higher rates in Minnesota than elsewhere in North America. Recently observed increases in mortality rates amongst some moose in northeastern Minnesota have led to concern that the population there may be entering a decline like that seen in the northwestern part of the state, where moose populations fell from over 4,000 to fewer than 100 in less than 20 years. Additionally the specific causes of increased mortality amongst individual moose remain under investigation.

Recipient
Metropolitan Council/University of Minnesota/Minnesota Technical Assistance Program (MnTAP)
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$33,130
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$16,870
Fund Source

The University of Minnesota Technical Assistance Program (MnTAP) identified opportunities for industrial water users in the North and East Metro Groundwater Management Area (N&E Metro GWMA) to reduce their water consumption as part of the Department of Natural Resources strategies under the GWMA plan. The source of water in this delineated region is almost exclusively groundwater. Several approaches were used for this effort in order to reach, inform, and interact with a broad range of industrial users.

Recipient
Metropolitan Council/University of Minnesota/Minnesota Technical Assistance Program (MnTAP)
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$15,650
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$48,700
Fund Source

The Metropolitan Council, in conjunction with the University of Minnesota Technical Assistance Program (MnTAP), are exploring opportunities for water conservation by businesses in the eleven county metropolitan area. Opportunities for water conservation will be defined for three businesses through the dedicated resources of three MnTAP interns. The interns will analyze water conservation opportunities through full time work on site over the summers of 2014 and 2015.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$196,000

Space and water heating and cooling consume 48% of all energy used in an average U.S. residence, and usually that energy is supplied by natural gas or fossil-fuel derived electricity. Geothermal heat pumps can reduce energy requirements for heating and cooling by up to 75%. However, traditional geothermal heat pumps are expensive and their performance is difficult to predict before installation.