All Projects

Showing 1 - 40 of 76 | Export projects
Recipient
Blue Earth County Drainage Authority
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$485,000

This project is a model for future drainage projects across the state and represents a fundamental shift in the way rural drainage systems interact with the landscape. This is a community-based water quality and treatment demonstration project in which landowners, local government, and state agencies have developed a watershed approach to improving water quality and replacing outdated drainage systems. The project will improve water quality, improve wildlife habitat, and develop a process for future projects by constructing water quality features within the 6,000 acre watershed.

Recipient
Anoka Conservation District
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$600,000
Fund Source

A direct appropriation of $400,000 in FY 2010 and $600,000 in FY2011 for the Anoka Conservation District (ACD) is for the metropolitan landscape restoration program for water quality and improvement projects in the seven-county metro area.

Recipient
Washington Conservation District
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$48,270
Fund Source

The Washington Conservation District (WCD), Washington County, and South Washington Watershed District (SWWD) are partnering to retrofit water quality improvement practices at the Oakdale Library. The goal is clean water and the project will work toward the 101 pound phosphorus load reduction target for Armstrong Lake identified in the SWWD Watershed Plan. The project will also benefit Wilmes Lake, which is downstream from Armstrong and is impaired by excess nutrients.

Recipient
Blue Earth County
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$136,842
Fund Source

Vegetated buffer and filter strips along waterways is a practice that addresses many surface water concerns. Establishing permanent vegetation along waterways is an implementation priority in the Blue Earth County Water Management Plan and required by local ordinance and Minnesota Rules. Minnesota Shoreland Rules, Chapter 6120 and the County Shoreland Ordinance contain standards for agricultural uses in shoreland. Agricultural uses are permitted in shoreland areas if steep slopes and shore and bluff impact zones are maintained in permanent vegetation.

Recipient
Blue Earth SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$57,895
Fund Source

Ravine, stream bank and bluff erosion contribute significant amounts of sediment to rivers and streams. The MPCA report, Identifying sediment sources in the Minnesota River Basin, found the Blue Earth and Le Sueur watersheds contribute as such as half of the sediment to the Minnesota River, even though they account for only one-fifth of its drainage area. These watersheds contain the majority of the bluffs in the basin as well as many large
ravines.

Recipient
Brown's Creek Watershed District
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$210,000
Fund Source

Brown's Creek is the namesake of Brown's Creek Watershed District (BCWD) and a designated metro trout stream. But in recent years the stream hasn't been home to as many trout and cold-water insects as we would hope. The creek is too warm and too muddy.

Recipient
Becker SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$57,653
Fund Source

The Floyd chain of lakes is of economic significance to the Detroit Lakes region providing great game fishing, boating and other summer and winter recreational opportunities. Decades of nutrient loading into North Floyd from the surrounding Campbell Creek area has led to a decrease in water quality. The same is true for the Buffalo River portion of this project area.

Recipient
Carver County Watershed Management Organization
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$174,732
Fund Source

Carver County has completed a Fecal Coliform Total Maximum Daily Load(TMDL) and Implementation Plan (IP).

Recipient
Cass SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$77,862
Fund Source

This 3-part project is developing and installing shoreline buffer projects on Ten Mile Lake, and the Roosevelt, Lawrence, Leavitt Lake area (RALALA).An additional part will correct roadway erosion contributing to sedimentation and water quality degradation on Buxton Road between McKeowen and Mann Lakes. Woodrow Township will work with Cass County SWCD/ESD and adjacent landowners to construct sedimentation basins and rain gardens and restructure the roadbed by reducing the slope to eliminate erosion and sedimentation.

Recipient
Crow Wing SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$136,300
Fund Source

Crow Wing SWCD is building off its success with Project Recharge and expanded the program to target Gull and Big Trout lakes. The SWCD selected these two lakes because of their declining transparency readings, 25 interested landowners, 2 adjacent resorts, and the community support, past partnerships, valuable fisheries, high ratio of forested land, and low ratio of impervious area in the lakeshed.The SWCD worked with partners to find willing landowners and businesses to complete the following types of projects:Swap Rock for Native Stock: Implement bioengineering to stabilize shorelines.

Recipient
Scott Watershed Management Organization
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$14,832
Fund Source

This project targets stabilizing 900+ feet of eroding shoreline in the Cedar Lake Farms Regional Park converting it into a healthy native buffer on Cedar Lake.The project addresses phosphorus loading by reducing erosion from unstable shoreline banks adjacent to Cedar Lake. This will increase infiltration, intercept upland runoff, and stabilize the soil at the water's edge to decrease erosion and the addition of phosphorus into the lake. It is estimated that a shoreline stabilization at Cedar Lake will reduce 12-25 lbs/ year phosphorus depending on the regression rate.

Recipient
Aitkin SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$108,011
Fund Source

Cedar and Farm Island are large recreational lakes located in the Aitkin/Brainerd Lakes area. Both lakes are showing significant downward trends in water clarity. The trend coincides with watershed development that increases water runoff. This project seeks to reverse that trend before these lakes degrade further and become impaired. Changing land uses now through incentives is a very cost-effective way to manage these lakes.

Recipient
Chisago SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$230,526
Fund Source

The Chisago Lakes Chain of Lakes Stormwater Retrofit Assessment has assessed 54 small watersheds for the optimal locations for best management practices. A long list of Best Management Practices has been identified, the next step is to design and install the most cost effective projects.

Recipient
Greater Blue Earth River Basin Alliance
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$242,075
Fund Source

The nine member Counties and Soil and Water Conservation Districts of the Greater Blue Earth River Basin Alliance (GBERBA) will be able to enhance our effectiveness to provide elevated levels of technical assistance, education and outreach in the areas of urban stormwater, wellhead protection, nutrient management, conservation agronomy, drainage and agricultural best management practices to reduce nonpoint source pollution in the Blue Earth, Le Sueur and Watonwan River Watersheds.

Recipient
Conservation Corps of Minnesota & Iowa
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,000,000
Fund Source

The Board of Water and Soil Resources is required to contract with the Conservation Corps of Minnesota and Iowa (formerly Minnesota Conservation Corps), or CCMI, for installation of conservation practices benefitting water quality for at least $500,000 in each year of the 2010-11 biennium.

Recipient
Buffalo-Red River Watershed District
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$105,408
Fund Source

A partnership of local, state and federal organizations has used multiple funding sources to target nonpoint pollution reduction efforts to the Hay Creek Watershed, a 24-square-mile area in Becker County that features several high- quality lakes. Clean Water Legacy grants were received in 2008 by the Buffalo-Red River Watershed District and in 2011 by the Becker SWCD. The grants leveraged both local and federal dollars, and it built on previous efforts to identify locations where conservation projects could provide the greatest benefits for water quality and wildlife habitat.

Recipient
Chisago SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$31,579
Fund Source

This project will inventory active gully erosion sites along the St. Croix River escarpment from the entrance to Wild River State Park near Almelund, MN, and south to the Chisago County line. The resulting inventory will be utilized to contact landowners with actively eroding gully sites on their property and will begin the process of developing a plan to implement Best Management Practices (BMPs) to correct the problems.

Recipient
Cedar River Watershed District
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$163,596
Fund Source

In the summer of 2011, conservation practices were installed in the upper reaches of Dobbins Creek to stabilize eroding stream banks. We contracted with the non-profit Minnesota Conservation Corps to assist with the labor. The crew worked efficiently, the weather cooperated perfectly, and the project came together exactly as planned. The banks of Dobbins Creek were armored with native cedar trees and anchored to the banks. Once the project was complete, we cut the side slopes back to reduce future erosion in the newly protected banks.

Recipient
West Otter Tail SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$65,684
Fund Source

The Otter Tail River serves as the main drinking water supply for the city of Fergus Falls. The community recognizes it as a valuable resource which needs to be protected. The lower reach of the Otter Tail River is listed as being impaired for turbidity(muddiness).

Recipient
East Otter Tail SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$87,371
Fund Source

Many of the aquifers that are located under Otter Tail County are susceptible to contamination from nitrates and other water soluble contaminants due to the coarse grained soils of the area. These aquifers are used by municipalities and rural residents. One of the common agricultural practices in the area that can have an effect on these aquifers is agricultural irrigation. Over application of irrigation can directly lead to leaching of nutrients that can contaminate our groundwater resources.

Recipient
Elk River Watershed Association
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$149,104
Fund Source

The Elk River Watershed Association (ERWSA) was formed to enable Sherburne and Benton Counties to work together to implement Local Water Management Plans. Since its formation in 1994, the ERWSA has primarily focused on working with land owners to reduce non-point sources of pollution within the watershed. Sherburne and Benton SWCD staff have extensive experience installing conservation practices. The ERWSA draws support from Sherburne County, Benton County, and local lake associations.

Recipient
Red Lake SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$102,895
Fund Source

Gullies are a fixture of the landscape. Except for avoiding them during field work they can be ignored for years and the benefits to the landowner of fixing them never seem to outweigh the costs for doing so. It is only when viewed over time that the true impact becomes apparent. Red Lake County SWCD identified these two project locations as high priority due to the large amount of sediment these projects have contributed to the Red Lake River. Those impacts will continue as the erosion accelerates and they become deeper and wider over time.

Recipient
Multiple Local Government Units
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,436,888
Fund Source

Currently, there are approximately 5,050 feedlots with fewer than 300 animal units that need to come into compliance with State feedlot rules. Clean Water Feedlot Water Quality Management Grant funds are being used to provide financial assistance to landowners with feedlot operations less than 300 animal units in size and located in a riparian area or impaired watershed.

Recipient
Cottonwood and Jackson SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$255,900
Fund Source

Fish Lake is a headwater of the Watonwan River. The lake is a regionally known fishery due to its unusual depth >20', lack of a mud bottom, and a naturally reproducing smallmouth bass fishery. The watershed has many tile drainage systems that are a source of nutrients to the lake. Woodchip bioreactors will be installed to reduce nitrogen from all tile outlets entering Fish Lake. This will help achieve the goal of a 40% reduction in Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) in the Minnesota River.

Recipient
Red Lake Watershed District
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$187,974
Fund Source

The Thief River is the source of drinking water for the City of Thief River Falls. The river's other designated uses also include recreation and aquatic life. Water quality monitoring conducted by local agencies discovered that the Thief River is not meeting state water quality standards for both turbidity (muddiness) and dissolved oxygen. Each year, approximately 12,376 tons of sediment is deposited into the Thief River Falls reservoir by the Thief River. That is the equivalent of over 1,200 dump trucks full of dirt.

Recipient
Red Lake Watershed District
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$187,974
Fund Source

The Thief River is the source of drinking water for the City of Thief River Falls. The river's other designated uses also include recreation and aquatic life. Water quality monitoring conducted by local agencies discovered that the Thief River is not meeting state water quality standards for both turbidity (muddiness) and dissolved oxygen. Each year, approximately 12,376 tons of sediment is deposited into the Thief River Falls reservoir by the Thief River. That is the equivalent of over 1,200 dump trucks full of dirt.

Recipient
Red Lake Watershed District
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$662,000
Fund Source

In the early 1900s, a joint State and County drainage project constructed a 1 mile outlet channel to Grand Marais Creek to provide a shorter outlet to the Red River and effectively abandoned the lower 6 miles of the natural channel. In recent times, the ditch has eroded from its original shape to a channel of steep gradients and unstable banks. This has resulted in head cutting of the channel and nearly continuous channel erosion and bank sloughing with the effect of depositing up to an estimated annual average of 700 tons of sediment into the Red River.

Recipient
Fillmore SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$126,316
Fund Source

The drainage areas for the Root and Whitewater rivers are located in the karst region of southeastern Minnesota. Karst is defined as a landscape with depressions such as sinkholes caused by underground erosion that dissolves the limestone bedrock making this region home to one of the largest collections of freshwater springs in the United States and some of the best trout fishing in the Midwest.

Recipient
Pennington SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$34,375
Fund Source

The Halvorson Streambank Stabilization site is located three miles north of the City of Thief River Falls on the Thief River. The Thief River is impaired for low dissolved oxygen and turbidity. A TMDL study began in 2010. These impairments affect fish spawning habitat, recreation and the drinking water supply of Thief River Falls. Studies show that 63% of the sediment in the Thief River is coming from the banks of the river itself. Stabilizing this bank will reduce the turbidity and low dissolved oxygen impairments.

Recipient
Dodge County
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$19,225
Fund Source

Agricultural drainage is very prevalent practice in Dodge County and there is a need to implement practices to that will better manage flow and pollutant loads that are being contributed to nearby surface waters. This project involves the installation of a woodchip bioreactor on a tile-drained agricultural field, which will feature improvements in design, and monitoring scope, as compared to a previous bioreactor constructed in Dodge County in 2007.

Recipient
Isanti County
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$65,924
Fund Source

Project will focus on BMP's that reduce runoff and/or keep water on the land. The establishment of 8 native plantings on 153 acres using an approved 15 native species mix on marginal farm fields will significantly reduce runoff of sediments and nutrients, and act as a filter to remove nutrients and sediment from fields upslope. Based on RUSLE2 estimates, 336.6 tons/yr of soil will be saved, and 202 lbs/yr of phosphorus and 3,336 lbs/yr of nitrates will not runoff the fields and/or leach into the ground water.

Recipient
Pennington SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$93,844
Fund Source

The 14,080 acre watershed of JD#30 and JD#18 drains into the Thief River four miles upstream of Thief River Falls. The City of Thief River Falls draws their drinking water from the reservoir the Thief River supplies. This reservoir is filling with sediment faster than anticipated. It was first estimated that the reservoir would require dredging every 50 years. The last dredging was needed in only 35 years at a price tag of $1.1 million. Treatment of the water for drinking is a major expense to the City.

Recipient
Kittson SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$100,000
Fund Source

Kittson County and the Two Rivers Watershed District both have plans that emphasize the use of Best Management Practices to improve the water quality of Lake Bronson. Lake Bronson State Park is one of only a handful of state parks in the Northwest corner of Minnesota and the Friends of the Lake Bronson State Park met with Watershed District staff to explore how to improve the water quality of the lake. The lake is subject to sediment and nutrient loading from several upstream ditches.

Recipient
Nobles SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$162,105
Fund Source

The Lake Ocheda Shoreline Improvement Project will restore and provide long term protection of 1,600 feet of lake shoreline resulting in improved drinking water supplies, improved water quality for fishery and upland habitat and historical preservation. A large portion of this shoreline currently has a 10 to 20 foot vertical wall of shoreline that has been sloughing for the past 50 to 100 years.

Recipient
Middle St. Croix Watershed Management Organization
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$43,400
Fund Source

Lily Lake, in Stillwater, is a popular recreational spot for residents with its swimming beach, fishing pier, and canoe access. Lily Lake is impaired by excess nutrients, and restoring its water quality is a priority for the community.

Recipient
Legislative Coordinating Commission
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$695,000
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$600,000
Fund Source

This appropriation is for the administration of the the Lessard-Sams Outdoor Heritage Council.

Recipient
South St. Louis SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$154,893
Fund Source

This grant will restore a section of Miller Creek, an urban trout stream located in Duluth, that was straightened many years ago back to its natural channel. The original channel had a lot more sinuosity, or, curviness, than it does now and the straightened creek suffers from erosion and warm temperatures illsuited for trout.

Recipient
City of St. Louis Park
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000
Fund Source

The City of St. Louis Park, in partnership with the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District, is proposing to re-meander a portion of the creek using funding provided through the Clean Water Fund. The affected section of Minnehaha Creek was straightened when development first came to St. Louis Park in the early 1900s. At that time, wetlands were filled and the stream channel was
altered to allow for industrial development around the creek.

Recipient
Board of Water and Soil Resources
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$368,000


PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
Bois de Sioux Watershed District
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$130,106
Fund Source

The Mustinka River winds through five counties in west central Minnesota and empties into Lake Traverse, a border waters lake with excellent fishing and recreational opportunities. For several years, sections of the river have been impaired for turbidity due to too much soil/sediment eroding from the land and washing away into the water. Excess sediment degrades aquatic habitat
and feeds algae blooms.