All Projects

Showing 1 - 40 of 106 | Export projects
Recipient
Minnesota State University, Mankato
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$69,438
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$260,324
Fund Source

This project goal is to conduct water chemistry monitoring at seventeen stream locations, to record and submit all data collected through this process, and to provide the information necessary for the calculation of water quality pollutant loads using the FLUX32 program.

Recipient
Minnesota Geological Survey
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$305,000
Fund Source

This project will accelerate production of County Geologic Atlases (part A). This is a set of geologic maps and associated databases for a county that facilitate informed management of natural resources, especially water and minerals.

Recipient
Minnesota Geological Survey
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$615,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$615,000
Fund Source

This project will accelerate production of County Geologic Atlases (part A). An atlas is a set of geologic maps and associated databases for a county that facilitate informed management of natural resources, especially water and minerals.

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$900,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN - MAISRC
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$8,700,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$4,350,000

Aquatic invasive species pose critical ecological and economic challenges for the entire state and beyond. They can cause irreparable harm to fisheries and aquatic habitat as well as damage to infrastructure. The problems posed by aquatic invasive species continue to grow as existing infestations expand and new exotic species arrive, most of which are poorly understood. New ideas and approaches are needed to develop real solutions.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Through various means, human produced chemicals can make their way into surface waters where they can have adverse effects on the function of ecological communities. Of particular concern are antibiotics and other antimicrobial substances because they have the potential to create increased antibiotic resistance. While there is a background level of naturally occurring antibiotic resistance in the natural world, elevated or persistent levels caused by human activities have the potential to harm human, animal, and overall ecosystem health.

Recipient
The College of Saint Scholastica
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$4,800
Art Project Grant
Recipient
The College of Saint Scholastica
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$4,990

Engage visual artist Tacoumba Aiken to work with area residents of all ages to collaboratively design and paint a canvas wall mural.

Recipient
The College of Saint Scholastica
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,658
Host a performance and educational workshop by the Lily Cai Chinese Dance Company in October, 2011.
Recipient
The College of Saint Scholastica
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,658
Host a performance of The Intergalactic Nemesis in November, 2011.
Recipient
College of Saint Benedict AKA College of Saint Benedict Fine Arts Programming
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$12,588
The College of Saint Benedict will present a free outdoor concert series, Sunset Stages at Saint Benedict’s, designed to specifically engage the Saint Joseph community and featuring Minnesota artists.
Recipient
The College of Saint Scholastica
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$14,750
The College of St. Scholastica is requesting a one year grant that would provide critical funding for its 2010-2011 Performing Arts Series, which offers a variety of arts experiences that would not normally be available in this largely rural region.
Recipient
University of Saint Thomas
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$25,647
Arts Tour Minnesota
Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000

There is a critical need to understand how our natural resources are already responding to climate change in order to develop tools for projecting natural resource responses into the future and to devise plans for actions that can be taken in reaction to observed and predicted changes. Phenology – the timing of seasonal biological events such as budburst, flowering, bird migration, and leaf coloring – provides a tested indicator of climate change response by plants and animals.

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$5,739
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$148,900
Fund Source

This project will promulgate a nitrate water quality standard to address aquatic life toxicity, and gather information needed to support the development of total nitrogen (N) loading reduction strategies for Minnesota’s waters and also address Minnesota’s contribution to marine water hypoxia. Project will also develop a framework for a watershed nitrogen planning aid that can be used to optimize selection of Best Management Practice (BMP) systems for reducing nitrogen.

Recipient
Ampers
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,623,500

Ampers member stations are producing a variety of programs, documentaries and musical specials on Minnesota's arts, historical, and cultural heritage. The stations are also offering free public performances. The on-air projects are aired on member stations, shared with other stations in the network and archived on station websites and the Ampers website: www.ampers.org

Recipient
U of MN - Duluth
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000


PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN - Duluth
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$262,000

Silver carp are migrating north up the Mississippi River and pose threats to the native fish and aquatic ecosystems of Minnesota rivers and lakes where they can become established. Additionally, the unique jumping ability of silver carp also places recreational boaters in danger of being injured during collisions with airborne fish. However, it is believed that this jumping ability could potentially be exploited as a weakness to help detect, manage, and control silver carp populations. Researchers at the University of Minnesota – Duluth, in cooperation with the U.S.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$854,000

Invasive carp species, including silver carp and bighead carp, are migrating north up the Mississippi River and pose threats to the native fish and aquatic ecosystems of Minnesota rivers and lakes where they can become established. While individual carp have been found in Minnesota, it is not presently believed that there are established breeding populations in the state.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$167,000

Brown marmorated stink bug is a terrestrial invasive species in Minnesota that was first discovered in 2010 and has been expanding its range since. It is a generalist plant pest that attacks more than 300 species of plants in natural, agricultural, and horticultural settings and is known for its unpleasant odor, large numbers, and propensity for home invasion. Proactive management approaches are available and in development that can be used to slow and potentially control brown marmorated stink bug populations.

Recipient
St. Cloud State University
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$9,996
To hire a qualified archaeologist to conduct a survey of four archaeological sites to determine dates of earliest human occupation.
Recipient
Minnesota State University, Mankato (Department of Anthropology)
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$8,770
To provide better organization of archaeological collections, allowing for greater public access to historic resources.
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$74,000

On many public lands in northwest Minnesota, cattail growth has far exceeded the distribution recommended for optimum wetland wildlife habitat and a need for cattail control has become recognized. Cattails have also recently been demonstrated to have bioenergy potential.

Recipient
Funding is awarded to projects selected by the evaluation committee. This is a competitive process.
2019 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$662,000
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$663,000
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$787,000
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$788,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,100,000
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,000,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,050,000
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,050,000
Fund Source

The  goals of the program are to evaluate the effectiveness of agricultural conservation practices, identify underlying processes that affect water quality, and develop technologies to target critical areas of the landscape. Funded projects provide current and accurate scientific data on the environmental impacts of agricultural practices and help to develop or revise agricultural practices that reduce environmental impacts while maintaining farm profitability.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$400,000

Minnesota ranks #2 in hog production and #1 in sugar beet production in the U.S., generating about 11 million tons of pig manure and over one million tons of sugar processing wastes annually. Presently there are not cost-effective methods available to deal with these waste streams other than land application, which usually results in nutrient runoff into ground and surface water resources.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$350,000

Though they are a relatively unnoticed group of species, native freshwater mussels are a critical part of river ecosystems because they provide a variety of important functions including improved water clarity, enhanced streambed stability, reduced downstream transport of contaminants, and creation of habitat for other aquatic life. However, mussel populations in Minnesota have declined in recent decades as a result of habitat destruction, pollution, land-use change, over-harvesting, and the introduction of exotic species.

Recipient
University of Minnesota Office of Sponsored Projects Administration (SPA)
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$145,000
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$145,000
Fund Source

The goal of this project is to develop a core team of wastewater professionals and academics engaged in understanding and solving wastewater-related problems in Minnesota, with national relevance. The team will promote the use of new technology, designs and practices to address existing and emerging wastewater treatement challenges, including the treatement of wastewater for reuse and the emergence of new and unregulated contaminants.

Recipient
Minnesota Geological Survey
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,130,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
University of Minnesota
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$33,414
Fund Source

This project will identify and compile existing nitrate data from groundwaters and surface waters in the Lower Mississippi Basin (LMB) generally and focus on the Root River Watershed. The purpose is to investigate the quantity and quality of existing nitrate data, and to organize it for use in comprehensive watershed strategy development (including assessment, TMDL computation and identification and study of nitrate sources and delivery mechanisms).

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,000,000

Each year Minnesota municipal wastewater treatment plants generate large amounts of oily scum, concentrated liquid called centrate, and sludge. These waste streams are disposed of either in landfills or by burning or subjected to additional treatment. However, new technologies have shown potential to capture resource values from these waste products while lowering the treatment costs for these waste streams.

Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$84,000

Minnesota’s natural resource professional workforce is much less diverse than its citizenry and many other professional fields. The benefits of a more diverse workforce are many, including the ability of organizations to increase innovation and creativity, attract higher qualified candidate pools, and ensure services that meet the diverse interests and needs of all citizens.

Recipient
U of MN - Duluth NRRI
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Mine stockpiles are unproductive due to soil deficiencies of organic matter, nutrients, and soil organisms, which are essential to supporting healthy plant growth, diversity, and succession. Waste products, including biosolids, composts, and dredged materials, have the potential to be used to address some of these deficiencies and make the lands productive again.

Recipient
Minnesota State University-Mankato
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$17,949
Fund Source

This project will quantify and qualify the effectiveness of herbicide treatments and native plant re-establishment at Duck Lake through systematic vegetative surveys pre and post herbicide application and following mid-summer die-off of curly-leaf pondweed. The data and analysis will ultimately be used in the development of TMDLs, implementation and protection strategies for other lakes in the Middle Minnesota Major Watershed.

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$636,000

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been decimating ash throughout the Great Lake States and is currently advancing into Minnesota, threatening the future of the ash forests that occur across much of the state. Of particular concern is the impact EAB will have on the ecology and functioning of black ash swamps, which cover over one million acres in Minnesota and represent the state’s most common ash forest type. Black ash trees grow and thrive in swamps and occupy a unique wet niche where few other tree species grow.

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$340,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$550,000


PROJECT OVERVIEW

Recipient
Regents of the University of Minnesota (Institute on Community Integration)
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$7,965
To hire qualified professionals to edit a manuscript on the Evelyn Deno anthology.
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$864,000

Pollinators play a key role in ecosystem function and in agriculture, including thousands of native plants and more than one hundred U.S. crops that either need or benefit from pollinators. However, pollinators are in dramatic decline in Minnesota and throughout the country. The causes of the decline are not completely understood, but identified factors include loss of nesting sites, fewer flowers, increased disease, and increased pesticide use. Fortunately, there are known actions that can be taken to help counteract some of these factors.

Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$264,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW