Minnesota's Legacy

All Projects

Showing 1 - 3 of 3 | Export projects
Recipient
Minnesota Department of Agriculture and Multiple local partners
2019 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$3,000,000
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,000,000
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,500,000
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,500,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,500,000
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,500,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$132,830
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$173,380
Fund Source

The Minnesota Ag Water Quality Certification Program (MAWQCP) is a voluntary opportunity for farmers and agricultural landowners to take the lead on implementing conservation practices that protect water quality. Those who implement and maintain approved conservation practices will be certified and in turn obtain regulatory certainty for a period of ten years. This program will help address concerns about changing regulatory requirements from multiple state and federal agencies.

Faribault
Jackson
Martin
Olmsted
Otter Tail
Stearns
Wabasha
Wilkin
Winona
Recipient
Minnesota Department of Agriculture
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$28,757
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$34,868
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$36,550
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$25,000
Fund Source

This project was part of a three-state partnership to test, demonstrate and promote a simple, inexpensive and reliable new system for edge-of-field water monitoring. The University of Wisconsin-Platteville Pioneer Farm, in collaboration with UW-Platteville Engineering, has developedĀ a low cost monitoring system that can obtain good quality, edge-of-field monitoring data in agricultural settings. By eliminating unnecessary features and assembling components in-house, the prototype monitoring system derives the majority of cost savings with minimal sacrifice in accuracy.

Dodge
Fillmore
Goodhue
Wabasha
Recipient
Zumbro Watershed Partnership
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$75,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$75,000

OVERALL PROJECT OUTCOME AND RESULTS
This project identified and prioritized areas in the Zumbro River Watershed that were determined critical for restoring and protecting water quality. Studies suggested that small areas of the landscape contribute disproportionately to nonpoint source pollution. So implementation of conservation projects that focus on those areas will maximize water quality benefits and ensure efficient use of resources.

Dodge
Goodhue
Olmsted
Rice
Steele
Wabasha