Minnesota's Legacy

All Projects

Showing 1 - 40 of 81 | Export projects
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Through various means, human produced chemicals can make their way into surface waters where they can have adverse effects on the function of ecological communities. Of particular concern are antibiotics and other antimicrobial substances because they have the potential to create increased antibiotic resistance. While there is a background level of naturally occurring antibiotic resistance in the natural world, elevated or persistent levels caused by human activities have the potential to harm human, animal, and overall ecosystem health.

Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000

There is a critical need to understand how our natural resources are already responding to climate change in order to develop tools for projecting natural resource responses into the future and to devise plans for actions that can be taken in reaction to observed and predicted changes. Phenology – the timing of seasonal biological events such as budburst, flowering, bird migration, and leaf coloring – provides a tested indicator of climate change response by plants and animals.

Statewide
Recipient
MN DNR
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$260,000

Over a three-month period in 2010, approximately five million barrels of oil was spilled into the Gulf of Mexico causing extensive damage to marine and wildlife habitats and resulting in significant losses in fish and wildlife populations. A number of Minnesota's migratory bird species spend parts of their lives in the areas impacted by the spill and impacts on their populations in the state could become evident over time.

Statewide
Recipient
MN DNR
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$141,000
Statewide
Recipient
St. Cloud State University
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$125,816
Fund Source

This project is a continuation of Statewide Lake study that revealed the obiquitous presence of endrocrine active compounds (EACs) in many MN Lakes. The initial project findings suggested two potential knowledge gaps in our understanding of EACs and their effects in lake environments. First, the sources of EACs and their entrance points into lakes need to be better defined than was possible in our previous statewide lake study.

Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000

Bees play a key role in ecosystem function and in agriculture, including more than one hundred U.S. crops either need or benefit from pollinators. However, bee pollinators are in dramatic decline in Minnesota and throughout the country. One of the potential causes appears to be a scarcity of bee-friendly flowers, particularly in urban areas, which is leading to nutritional deficiencies, chronic exposure to pesticides, and debilitating diseases and parasites.

Statewide
Recipient
MN DNR
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$140,000

Garlic mustard is a non-native, invasive plant species that is severely threatening native plant communities and degrading wildlife habitat in forest and riparian zones throughout the state. The plant is considered the highest priority species for development of long-term management solutions such as biological control, which involves using natural enemies of a non-native species from its native region to control or reduce the impact of the species in the areas where they are invasive.

Statewide
Recipient
Minnesota Department of Agriculture
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$447,000

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is an invasive insect that has been decimating ash trees throughout the Great Lake states and is currently advancing into Minnesota where it threatens the nearly 1 billion ash trees that occur throughout the state - the second most in any state. Loss of these trees would devastate ecosystems throughout Minnesota and have major economic impacts for the forest products industry as well as through the costs associated with treatment, removal, and replacement of lost trees.

Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$854,000

Invasive carp species, including silver carp and bighead carp, are migrating north up the Mississippi River and pose threats to the native fish and aquatic ecosystems of Minnesota rivers and lakes where they can become established. While individual carp have been found in Minnesota, it is not presently believed that there are established breeding populations in the state.

Statewide
Recipient
United States Geological Survey (USGS)
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$146,602
Fund Source

USGS will complete the following activities in support of the SCSU project Assessing the Contribution of Microhabitat Differences on Biological Effects in Bluegill Sunfish in Sullivan Lake, MN-Continuation of MN Lakes Study 2010-2011. Geospatial analysis of maps, aerial photography, satellite imagery, GIS data, and field mapping (topography, bathymetry, vegetation, habitat); Bulk characterization of the physical and chemical features of the littoral zone, inflows, and outflows.

Statewide
Recipient
MN DNR
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$88,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$87,000


PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide
Recipient
Hiawatha Valley Resource Conservation & Development, Inc.
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$52,000

Terrestrial invasive plants such as buckthorn, wild parsnip, garlic mustard, and others are becoming widespread threats throughout many sites in Minnesota. Present chemical and mechanical control methods tend to be costly, effective only in the short-term, or have other negative environmental impacts. However, an alternative practice of using grazing animals for invasive species management is used successfully in many parts of the western United States.

Dodge
Fillmore
Freeborn
Goodhue
Houston
Mower
Olmsted
Rice
Steele
Wabasha
Winona
Recipient
MN DNR
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$540,000

Asian carp pose a real and serious threat to Minnesota’s aquatic ecosystems. While there are a few instances of individual carp being found in Minnesota waters, including the Mississippi and St. Croix Rivers, it is not presently believed that there are significant established populations in the state. In order to quickly and effectively respond to threats posed by Asian carp in the future, though, detailed information about the fish themselves is needed.

Statewide
Recipient
Minnesota Department of Agriculture
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$350,000

New invasive plant species continue to emerge in Minnesota and will pose ongoing threats to Minnesota’s economy, ecology, and environment if able to spread across the state. It is cheapest, easiest, and least harmful to find and control small populations of invasive plants before they become widespread.

Statewide
Recipient
Dept. of Agriculture
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Aitkin
Becker
Beltrami
Benton
Carlton
Cass
Clearwater
Cook
Crow Wing
Hubbard
Itasca
Koochiching
Lake
Lake of the Woods
Mahnomen
Marshall
Morrison
Otter Tail
Pennington
Pine
Polk
Red Lake
Roseau
St. Louis
Todd
Wadena
Recipient
U of MN
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000

Elms were once a very widespread tree in Minnesota and amongst the most common and popular in urban landscapes due to their size, shading capability, and tolerance of pollution and other stresses. Over the past five decades, though, Dutch elm disease, an exotic and invasive pathogen, has killed millions of elms throughout the state. However, scientists at the University of Minnesota have observed that some elms have survived the disease and appear to have special characteristics that make them resistant to Dutch elm disease.

Statewide
Recipient
National Eagle Center
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$30,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$30,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Dakota
Fillmore
Goodhue
Houston
Olmsted
Rice
Wabasha
Winona
Recipient
U of MN
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$838,000

The Soudan Iron Mine near Ely, Minnesota is no longer an active mine and is now part of a state park, as well as the home to a state-of-the-art physics laboratory at the bottom of the mine. The mine has also been discovered to contain an extreme environment in the form of an ancient and very salty brine bubbling up from a half-mile below the Earth’s surface through holes drilled when the mine was active. Strange microorganisms – part of an ecosystem never before characterized by science – have been found living in the brine.

Statewide
Recipient
The Nature Conservancy
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$365,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results
The Nature Conservancy's (TNC) 2009 work program focused on 6 habitat restoration projects totaling 3,664 acres (3,118-ENRTF funds; 546-other funds). Additional details, beyond the short summary below, are found in the more detailed reporting provided for each project.

Statewide
Recipient
Minnesota Land Trust
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$210,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Statewide
Recipient
MN DNR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results
This project focused on the acquisition of habitat linkages that provided environmental protection of the shoreline and riparian zone, exhibited a high risk of development, supplied angler access, and afforded management access necessary for implementing habitat improvement projects.

Project goals were to protect 120 acres (1.4 miles of lake and stream shoreline) with the help of partner and other state funding. Partner funding includes donations of land value and cash.

Statewide
Recipient
Pheasants Forever
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$100,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Duties assigned to the project coordinator under this work program and as outlined and approved by the Habitat Conservation Partnership were to:

Statewide
Recipient
US Fish and Wildlife Service
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$50,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Statewide
Recipient
Ducks Unlimited, Inc.
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$225,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results
The objective of this project was to accelerate Ducks Unlimited (DU) bio-engineering assistance to help agencies design and construct enhancement projects on shallow lakes for waterfowl using water control structures. DU biologists and engineers provided technical assistance to Minnesota DNR, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and private landowners around shallow lakes with a goal of:

Statewide
Recipient
MN DNR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$145,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results
DNR spent $140,689 to continue on-site field investigations to accelerate management of shallow lakes and adjacent wetland complexes and support the accomplishments of Ducks Unlimited through HCP 2c and 3c. Temporary field personnel (1 full time and up to 6 temporary) documented shallow lake habitat occurrence and quality. Habitat surveys were conducted on 171 lakes within seven HCP project areas. The lakes surveyed totaled over 82,831acres. The surveys were distributed more broadly than in the past with:

Statewide
Recipient
MN DNR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$50,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Statewide
Recipient
MN DNR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$100,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Statewide
Recipient
National Wild Turkey Federation
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$85,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results
This project contained two types of habitat enhancement that resulted in the enhancement of a total of 72 acres of habitat.

Cottonwood
Fillmore
Goodhue
Houston
Jackson
Recipient
MN DNR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$75,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Statewide
Recipient
MN DNR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$75,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Statewide
Recipient
Ducks Unlimited, Inc.
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results
The objective of this project was to accelerate Ducks Unlimited (DU) efforts to help improve and protect shallow lakes managed for waterfowl. To protect shallow lakes, DU worked with private shallow lake shoreline landowners to secure permanent conservation easements on managed shallow lakes prioritized by DU for their importance to waterfowl and threat of development. The goal was to permanently protect at least 200 shallow lake shoreland acres.

Statewide
Recipient
Ducks Unlimited, Inc.
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$420,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Statewide
Recipient
Pheasants Forever, Inc.
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$350,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Statewide
Recipient
The Trust for Public Land
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$350,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Statewide
Recipient
MN DNR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$25,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results
This project focused on paying professional services related to the conveyance of habitat corridor lands to the DNR by HCP partners. Parcels acquired from HCP partners will be placed in public ownership and administered as State Wildlife Management Areas.

Project goals were to pay professional services as parcels are conveyed to DNR by nonprofit HCP partners. During this appropriation only Pheasants Forever (PF) projects were conveyed to DNR.

Statewide
Recipient
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$743,000

Most mercury in Minnesota waters is deposited from the atmosphere as a byproduct of burning coal and other compounds. Once in the environment, mercury can convert to a form called methylmercury where it bioaccumulates up the food chain from microscopic plants and animals to fish and then to humans and wildlife that consume the fish. The first step in solving the problem of mercury in fish is reducing the sources of mercury entering waters.

Statewide
Recipient
UMD, NRRI
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$507,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Cook
Koochiching
Lake
St. Louis
Recipient
University of St. Thomas
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$136,000

Endocrine-disrupting contaminants such as environmental estrogens have been found and studied in large lakes and streams and shown to exist at concentrations that have adverse effects on wildlife. However, very little is known about the sources and effects of environmental estrogens in small, shallow lakes. Preliminary data suggests that these compounds are present in shallow lakes and have an effect on the survival and reproduction of wildlife. Researchers at the University of St.

Statewide
Recipient
Audubon Minnesota
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$151,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide