Minnesota's Legacy

All Projects

Showing 1 - 40 of 179 | Export projects
Recipient
Board of Water and Soil Resources
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$4,100,000
Fund Source
Recipient
BWSR
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$313,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$312,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide
Recipient
Marshall County Soil and Water Conservation District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$178,750
Fund Source

The Thief River and its tributaries have deteriorating water quality due to sedimentation. Sediment plumes and deltas have formed at the inlets of pools in Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge (Agassiz Pool) and Thief Lake, an important recreational resource in Northwest Minnesota.

Marshall
Recipient
Dakota County Soil and Water Conservation District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000
Fund Source

This project will improve surface and groundwater quality in the rural sections of the Vermillion and North Cannon River Watersheds located in Dakota County through the installation of targeted structural and vegetative conservation practices. This project will leverage local and federal funds to provide technical and financial assistance to landowners that install agricultural water quality practices.

Dakota
Recipient
Grass Lake Watershed Management Organization
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$32,000
Fund Source

At 410 acres, Lake Owasso is the largest lake in the Grass Lake Water Management Organization (GLWMO) and one of the most pristine. Maintaining the lakes water quality is a priority for the GLWMO. A long urbanized area along Aladdin Street in Roseville currently lacks stormwater features to remove pollutants and reduce water volume. The rainwater from this area drains directly to a wetland which is hydrologically connected to Lake Owasso. Adjacent to the residential area is a 0.5 acre parking lot which drains into a ditch which eventually enters the same wetland.

Ramsey
Recipient
Clearwater Soil and Water Conservation District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$8,000
Fund Source

Clearwater County's lakes provide significant environmental, economic and recreational benefits . This project will assist local water management planning efforts by collecting and analyzing available lake water quality information and watershed characteristics for Bagley, Long Lake and Long Lost Lakes. Bringing the available water quality information that has been gathered and presenting it in a manner that is understandable to lake residents and other citizens is the goal of the project.

Clearwater
Recipient
Benton SWCD
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$16,500
Fund Source

This project continues water plan activities from a 2007 Clean Water Legacy grant and initiates a multi-county project to restore hydrology and water quality in an impaired trout stream.The first goal of this project is to reduce the impacts of animal manure and fertilizer on surface and groundwater by installing low cost feedlot improvements and targeted manure management planning.

Benton
Recipient
Anoka Conservation District
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$400,000
Fund Source

A direct appropriation of $400,000 in FY 2010 for the Anoka Conservation District (ACD) is for the metropolitan landscape restoration program for water quality and improvement projects in the seven-county metro area (the law also provides $600,000 for this purpose in FY2011).

Anoka
Carver
Dakota
Hennepin
Ramsey
Scott
Washington
Recipient
Anoka Conservation District
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$600,000
Fund Source

A direct appropriation of $400,000 in FY 2010 and $600,000 in FY2011 for the Anoka Conservation District (ACD) is for the metropolitan landscape restoration program for water quality and improvement projects in the seven-county metro area.

Anoka
Carver
Dakota
Hennepin
Ramsey
Scott
Washington
Recipient
Washington Conservation District
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$48,270
Fund Source

The Washington Conservation District (WCD), Washington County, and South Washington Watershed District (SWWD) are partnering to retrofit water quality improvement practices at the Oakdale Library. The goal is clean water and the project will work toward the 101 pound phosphorus load reduction target for Armstrong Lake identified in the SWWD Watershed Plan. The project will also benefit Wilmes Lake, which is downstream from Armstrong and is impaired by excess nutrients.

Washington
Recipient
Bassett Creek Watershed Management Organization
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$360,000
Fund Source

The Board of Water and Soil Resources is required to contract with the Conservation Corps of Minnesota and Iowa (formerly Minnesota Conservation Corps), or CCMI, for installation of conservation practices benefitting water quality for at least $500,000 in each year of the 2010-11 biennium.

Hennepin
Recipient
Blue Earth County
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$136,842
Fund Source

Vegetated buffer and filter strips along waterways is a practice that addresses many surface water concerns. Establishing permanent vegetation along waterways is an implementation priority in the Blue Earth County Water Management Plan and required by local ordinance and Minnesota Rules. Minnesota Shoreland Rules, Chapter 6120 and the County Shoreland Ordinance contain standards for agricultural uses in shoreland. Agricultural uses are permitted in shoreland areas if steep slopes and shore and bluff impact zones are maintained in permanent vegetation.

Blue Earth
Recipient
Crow Wing Soil and Water Conservation District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000
Fund Source

Based on the Minnesota Waters Lake and River Association database, Crow Wing County has the highest number of lake associations in Minnesota. Currently, there are over 136 lake association groups in the county, which does not include neighborhood, resort or religious groups. These lakes aer a cornerstone to the state's tourism econmy and there is a great demand for stormwater management incentive program to protect these local water resources.

Crow Wing
Recipient
Buffalo - Red River Watershed District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$57,818
Fund Source

Multiple water courses in the Buffalo River - Red River Watershed District are impaired for turbidity. These waterways include the Red River of the North, Wolverton Creek, Deerhorn Creek, Stoney Creek, South Branch Buffalo River, and the main stem of the Buffalo River. This project will provide a means of prioritizing areas of the watershed to implement conservation practices to reduce overland runoff contaminant loadings contributing to water quality impairments.

Becker
Clay
Otter Tail
Wilkin
Recipient
Becker Soil and Water Conservation District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$42,160
Fund Source

Erosion is a serious water quality issue found throughout the Buffalo-Red River Watersheds rivers and tributaries. Excessive erosion occurs in the beach ridge area where the land naturally has excessive slopes. The beach ridge area consists of sand and gravel deposited by wave action along the shoreline of Lake Agassiz at various times as the lake level rose and fell. The sand and gravel soils, combined with the relatively steep slopes of the area can be susceptible to erosion.

Becker
Recipient
Rice Soil and Water Conservation District
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000
Fund Source

The Cannon River Watershed is a diverse watershed from the standpoint of topography, land use, and land cover, but a central issue of concern is increased sedimentation and turbidity within the river. One of the best ways to keep sediment from entering the Cannon River is to install vegetative buffers on the smaller tributaries in the upper reaches of the watershed. This project is important as it aims to help identify strategic locations where buffers are needed and to assist landowners to install buffers that will directly help reduce sedimentation within the watershed.

Goodhue
Rice
Steele
Waseca
Recipient
Multiple Local Government Units
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,500,000
Fund Source

Funds are to be used to protect, enhance and restore water quality in lakes, rivers and streams and to protect groundwater and drinking water. Activities include structural and vegetative practices to reduce runoff and retain water on the land, feedlot water quality projects, SSTS abatement grants for low income individuals, and stream bank, stream channel and shoreline protection projects. For the fiscal year 2012, BWSR awarded 13 local governments with funds to complete 143 projects. More information is available in the detail reports below.

Big Stone
Cass
Dodge
Douglas
Lincoln
Marshall
McLeod
Mille Lacs
Pennington
Pipestone
Rock
St. Louis
Stearns
Recipient
Multiple Local Government Units
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,631,794
Fund Source

Funds are to be used to protect, enhance and restore water quality in lakes, rivers and streams and to protect groundwater and drinking water. Activities include structural and vegetative practices to reduce runoff and retain water on the land, feedlot water quality projects, SSTS abatement grants for low income individuals, and stream bank, stream channel and shoreline protection projects. For the fiscal year 2012, BWSR awarded 12 local governments with funds.

Chisago
Lac qui Parle
Lake of the Woods
McLeod
Mille Lacs
Pennington
Pope
St. Louis
Stearns
Todd
Washington
Winona
Recipient
Becker SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$57,653
Fund Source

The Floyd chain of lakes is of economic significance to the Detroit Lakes region providing great game fishing, boating and other summer and winter recreational opportunities. Decades of nutrient loading into North Floyd from the surrounding Campbell Creek area has led to a decrease in water quality. The same is true for the Buffalo River portion of this project area.

Becker
Recipient
Carver County Watershed Management Organization
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$174,732
Fund Source

Carver County has completed a Fecal Coliform Total Maximum Daily Load(TMDL) and Implementation Plan (IP).

Carver
Recipient
Cass SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$77,862
Fund Source

This 3-part project is developing and installing shoreline buffer projects on Ten Mile Lake, and the Roosevelt, Lawrence, Leavitt Lake area (RALALA).An additional part will correct roadway erosion contributing to sedimentation and water quality degradation on Buxton Road between McKeowen and Mann Lakes. Woodrow Township will work with Cass County SWCD/ESD and adjacent landowners to construct sedimentation basins and rain gardens and restructure the roadbed by reducing the slope to eliminate erosion and sedimentation.

Cass
Recipient
Crow Wing SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$136,300
Fund Source

Crow Wing SWCD is building off its success with Project Recharge and expanded the program to target Gull and Big Trout lakes. The SWCD selected these two lakes because of their declining transparency readings, 25 interested landowners, 2 adjacent resorts, and the community support, past partnerships, valuable fisheries, high ratio of forested land, and low ratio of impervious area in the lakeshed.The SWCD worked with partners to find willing landowners and businesses to complete the following types of projects:Swap Rock for Native Stock: Implement bioengineering to stabilize shorelines.

Crow Wing
Recipient
Scott Watershed Management Organization
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$14,832
Fund Source

This project targets stabilizing 900+ feet of eroding shoreline in the Cedar Lake Farms Regional Park converting it into a healthy native buffer on Cedar Lake.The project addresses phosphorus loading by reducing erosion from unstable shoreline banks adjacent to Cedar Lake. This will increase infiltration, intercept upland runoff, and stabilize the soil at the water's edge to decrease erosion and the addition of phosphorus into the lake. It is estimated that a shoreline stabilization at Cedar Lake will reduce 12-25 lbs/ year phosphorus depending on the regression rate.

Scott
Recipient
Aitkin SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$108,011
Fund Source

Cedar and Farm Island are large recreational lakes located in the Aitkin/Brainerd Lakes area. Both lakes are showing significant downward trends in water clarity. The trend coincides with watershed development that increases water runoff. This project seeks to reverse that trend before these lakes degrade further and become impaired. Changing land uses now through incentives is a very cost-effective way to manage these lakes.

Aitkin
Recipient
Vadnais Lake Area Water Management Organization
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$55,800
Fund Source

Lambert Creek discharges into Vadnais Lake, the final impoundment reservoir containing the potable water supply for the city of St. Paul and eight nearby suburbs. Monitoring data indicates high nutrient levels and the creek is listed by the State as having high bacterial levels. In-stream work along Lambert Creek has been maximized with restoration improvements achieving nutrient load reduction. The next step to further improve water quality is to concentrate on restoration efforts on a subwatershed level.

Ramsey
Recipient
Cook County Soil and Water Conservation District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$34,978
Fund Source

Improving stormwater management in Grand Marais is a priority for the community. The Cook County Comprehensive Water Plan identifies water quality and quantity concerns related to residential development include increased runoff from roads, parking areas, roofs, etc. into Lake Superior.

Cook
Recipient
Clearwater River Watershed District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$738,750
Fund Source

The Clearwater Lake Chain has elevated nutrient levels which lead to poor water quality. The City of Kimball and surrounding agricultural area drains, mostly untreated, into a trout stream which empties into the Clearwater River Chain of Lakes.

Stearns
Recipient
Vadnais Lake Area Water Management Organization
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$105,200
Fund Source

Lambert Creek is wholly within the Vadnais Lake Area Water Management Area. Vadnais Lake is the drinking water reservoir for the City of St. Paul and surrounding communities. Lambert Creek has elevated bacteria and nutrient levels and water quality in Vadnais Lake will not improve unless there is a reduction in the phosphorus loading from Lambert Creek.

Ramsey
Recipient
Middle Fork Crow River Watershed District
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$15,602
Fund Source

Conservation or Managed drainage refers to efforts made to modify traditional tile drainage designs to operate more effectively. This conservation drainage project, located in Kandiyohi County, is a win-win solution to common trade offs in crop production. Draining fields in the spring and fall enables crops to be planted and harvested, but draining fields throughout the growing season can take water away from crops when they need it. Subsurface drainage can also adversely impact water quality by carrying nitrate and soluble phosphorus into downstream water bodies.

Kandiyohi
Recipient
Conservation Corps of Minnesota & Iowa
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,000,000
Fund Source

The Board of Water and Soil Resources is required to contract with the Conservation Corps of Minnesota and Iowa (formerly Minnesota Conservation Corps), or CCMI, for installation of conservation practices benefitting water quality for at least $500,000 in each year of the 2010-11 biennium.

Recipient
Becker Soil and Water Conservation District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$61,648
Fund Source

Bejou, Shoe and Dahlberg lakes are located in the upper reaches of one of the most popular fisheries in the region, the Cormorant Lakes chain.
Water quality issues impacting Bejou Lake were identified through the use of aerial photography. Results determined that a significant amount of sediment was being deposited into Bejou Lake from the 84 acre adjacent watershed. Several areas where water, sediment and erosion control basins could greatly reduce the amounts of sediments being delivered to the lake were identified.

Becker
Recipient
Washington Conservation District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$56,175
Fund Source

The goal of this project is to offer grant funding to boat marinas located in Washington County on the St. Croix River to complete water quality improvement projects. St. Croix marinas own large amounts of shoreline plus there are roads, parking areas, buildings, and garages. These all produce runoff that drains directly into the St. Croix River. Marinas also often include pollution hotspots due to the presence of boat fueling areas.

Washington
Recipient
Wright Soil and Water Conservation District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$66,580
Fund Source

The Crow River is a major river system in Wright County that is of local and regional significance. It is a major recreation area in its own right but also flows into the Mississippi River 20 miles from the Minneapolis Drinking Water Plant intake. Elevated sediment levels in the river increases the cost of treating the river water and threatens fisheries habitat.

Wright
Recipient
North Fork Crow River Watershed District
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$33,000
Fund Source

The purpose of this project is reduce peak flows in the North Fork of the Crow River through culvert sizing. Culvert sizing will typically result in smaller culverts, which will provide short-term temporary storage within channels and on adjacent lands upstream from road crossings. In addition to reducing peak flow rates, flood damage and downstream erosion, increased sediment and nutrient removal through extended detention time is expected.

Kandiyohi
Meeker
Pope
Stearns
Recipient
Dakota County Soil and Water Conservation District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$50,000
Fund Source

This project will provide cost share funding to community organizations and associations to construct medium-sized water quality conservation practices in Dakota County.

Dakota
Recipient
Comfort Lake Forest Lake Watershed District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$30,200
Fund Source

The Comfort Lake Forest Lake Watershed includes numerous private ditches and partially drained wetlands which are a priority for mapping, assessment and restoration. The project will include the mapping and assessment of all drained and partially drained wetlands in the watershed. In addition, a web-based GIS system will be developed to inventory, assess, target and track the effectiveness of various conservation practices towards the attainment of water quality goals.

Chisago
Washington
Recipient
Cedar River Watershed District
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$163,596
Fund Source

In the summer of 2011, conservation practices were installed in the upper reaches of Dobbins Creek to stabilize eroding stream banks. We contracted with the non-profit Minnesota Conservation Corps to assist with the labor. The crew worked efficiently, the weather cooperated perfectly, and the project came together exactly as planned. The banks of Dobbins Creek were armored with native cedar trees and anchored to the banks. Once the project was complete, we cut the side slopes back to reduce future erosion in the newly protected banks.

Recipient
West Otter Tail SWCD
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$65,684
Fund Source

The Otter Tail River serves as the main drinking water supply for the city of Fergus Falls. The community recognizes it as a valuable resource which needs to be protected. The lower reach of the Otter Tail River is listed as being impaired for turbidity(muddiness).

Otter Tail
Recipient
Stearns Soil and Water Conservation District
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
Fund Source

The Stearns County SWCD Enhanced Shoreline Restoration, Infiltration and Protection Program has accelerated natural resource restoration projects in Stearns County. The project partners are assisting in recruiting landowners to implement shoreline restoration, erosion control and infiltration projects to protect and improve water quality as well as fish and wildlife habitat. We have prioritized projects based on location and impact. The site will be ranked as a higher priority if the it is located near a body of water that has been listed as impaired or has an approved TMDL.

Stearns
Recipient
Pennington SWCD
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$77,600
Fund Source

The Thief River is impaired due to low Dissolved Oxygen and high Turbidity levels resulting from high sediment load. These impairments affect the drinking water supply of Thief River Falls in addition to fish spawning habitat and recreation. The Erosion, Sedimentation and Sediment Yield Report completed in 1996 found that 63% of the sediment originates from the streambank of the Thief River. The Pennington Soil and Water Conservation District is therefore targeting the major sediment sources along the river.

Pennington