Minnesota's Legacy

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Recipient
Area 6 - South Central Technical Service Area
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
Fund Source

South Central Technical Service Area (SCTSA) will use this Clean Water Fund grant to provide Soil and Water Conservation Districts and other local organizations in its eleven-county area with a Geographic Information System (GIS) Technician to assist in using available GIS information to target specific locations where Best Management Practices (BMPs) can be installed to help improve water quality.

Blue Earth
Brown
Faribault
Le Sueur
Martin
McLeod
Nicollet
Renville
Sibley
Waseca
Watonwan
Recipient
Clearwater River Watershed District
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$277,900
Fund Source

In 2002, citizens began to notice severe algal blooms in Cedar Lake, a high value recreational lake with exceptional clarity and fisheries habitat. Clearwater River Watershed District (CRWD) began an intensive monitoring program in 2003 to identify nutrient sources and protect Cedar Lake. Through intensive lake and watershed monitoring, CRWD identified the major source of nutrients to the lake. Three nutrient impaired shallow lakes; Swartout, Albion and Henshaw Lakes, in the upper watershed and impaired wetlands discharge excess amounts of soluble phosphorus.

Meeker
Stearns
Wright
Recipient
North Fork Crow River Watershed District
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$33,000
Fund Source

The purpose of this project is reduce peak flows in the North Fork of the Crow River through culvert sizing. Culvert sizing will typically result in smaller culverts, which will provide short-term temporary storage within channels and on adjacent lands upstream from road crossings. In addition to reducing peak flow rates, flood damage and downstream erosion, increased sediment and nutrient removal through extended detention time is expected.

Kandiyohi
Meeker
Pope
Stearns
Recipient
Heron Lake Watershed District
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$122,000

Once known for its clean water, fertile soil, and healthy habitat, in more recent times the Heron Lake Watershed in southwestern Minnesota has been heavily impacted by pollution from intensive agriculture, feedlots, non-compliant septic systems, and urban stormwater runoff. The Heron Lake Watershed District is using this appropriation for public outreach and installation and monitoring of water quality improvement projects aimed at reducing sediment and nutrient loading for the benefit of public health, recreation, and wildlife habitat.

Jackson
Murray
Nobles
Recipient
Middle Fork Crow River WD
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$97,500
Fund Source

The Middle Fork Crow River Watershed District will conduct a river assessment to determine the scope of eroding riverbanks and a stormwater modeling project to identify targeted locations for stormwater management. The river assessment will: 1) verify that streambank erosion is the major contributor of pollutants, including sediment, Phosphorus, and Nitrogen; 2) catalog and quantify the erosion, and; 3) provide an assessment of reductions that could be achieved using specific solutions.

Kandiyohi
Meeker
Recipient
Heron Lake WD
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$264,535
Fund Source

A Level III Feedlot Inventory in the West Fork Des Moines River Watershed identified the need for a new manure storage basin. The Heron Lake Watershed District will be partnering with Murray County, Murray Soil and Water Conservation District, and Southwest Prairie Technical Service Area to construct the basin to ensure that manure and milk house wastewater will be properly stored. In addition, the project will decrease the size and usage of open lots using buffer strip and pasture to significantly reduce nutrient loading.

Murray
Recipient
North Fork Crow River Watershed District
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$149,543
Fund Source

The North Fork Crow River Watershed (NFCRWD) is mainly agricultural and has numerous public and private drainage ditches. Sub-surface drainage are major contributors to the sediment and nutrient loading into the North Fork Crow River and area Lakes. This project help reach the Rice Lake phosphorous reductions goals. Local landowners are willing to contribute land on public drainage systems to retain water and restore wetlands at three locations with total anticipated yearly pollutant removals of 200 tons of total suspended sediment and 235 pounds of phosphorus.

Kandiyohi
Meeker
Pope
Stearns
Recipient
North Fork Crow River Watershed District
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$65,810
Fund Source

The primary land use within the North Fork Crow River Watershed District is mainly row crop agriculture with extensive public and private drainage systems. A large portion of existing tile lines have open intakes that directly transport sediment and nutrients to open ditches leading to the North Fork Crow River (NFCR). The NFCR flows into Rice Lake that is impaired for aquatic recreation due to excessive nutrients.

Kandiyohi
Meeker
Pope
Stearns
Recipient
North Fork Crow River WD
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$34,200
Fund Source

The North Fork Crow River Watershed District will develop an inventory and inspection database for 103E ditches under their drainage authority. The district will acquire a database software solution to conduct field inspections and to track ditch maintenance projects throughout the district. This software will be used to facilitate statutory compliance including developing a process for completing annual inspection and reporting requirements.

Kandiyohi
Meeker
Pope
Stearns
Recipient
Clearwater River Watershed District
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$70,900
Fund Source

Stormwater runoff from the City of Kimball drains untreated into Willow Creek, a trout stream. Willow Creek is tributary to Lake Betsy, which is impaired by excess nutrients. This project targets phosphorus removal for Lake Betsy as identified in the Upper Watershed TMDL Studies for the Clearwater River Watershed and protection to Willow Creek trout habitat by infiltrating the 1.5-inch storm event off 428 acres in and around the City of Kimball.

Meeker
Recipient
Redwood-Cottonwood Rivers Control Area (RCRCA)
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$52,600
Fund Source

The Redwood and Cottonwood River Watersheds have been assessed and many reaches have been impaired for turbidity, bacteria, and low dissolved oxygen. This project will accelerate conservation efforts to reduce overland runoff sediment, bacteria, and nutrient loadings contributing to water quality impairments in targeted subwatersheds.

Brown
Cottonwood
Lincoln
Lyon
Murray
Pipestone
Redwood
Yellow Medicine
Recipient
Redwood-Cottonwood Rivers Control Area (RCRCA)
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$560,000
Fund Source

The Redwood River and Cottonwood River watersheds encompass approximately 2,020 square miles of southwestern Minnesota in the Minnesota River Basin. Land use in these watersheds is mostly agricultural and area geology makes them prone to erosion. Surface water issues within the two watersheds are a concern of local leaders. The counties and Soil and Water Conservation District leaders formed the Redwood Cottonwood Rivers Control Area (RCRCA) Joint Powers Board in 1983 to address sedimentation, water quality and quantity, and erosion issues.

Brown
Cottonwood
Lincoln
Lyon
Murray
Pipestone
Redwood
Yellow Medicine
Recipient
Multiple Local Government Units
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$775,777
Fund Source

Imminent Health Threat (IHT) systems are those that are discharging improperly treated human waste onto the ground surface or into surface waters. In addition to the potential water quality impacts, untreated sewage has the potential to introduce bacteria and viruses into the environment. When IHT systems are identified, county or city staff assist the homeowners through the process required to bring their systems into compliance with the septic ordinance.

Cass
Chisago
Crow Wing
Dodge
Freeborn
McLeod
Meeker
Murray
Pipestone
Rice
Recipient
Multiple Local Government Units
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,357,221
Fund Source

Imminent Health Threat (IHT) systems are those that are discharging improperly treated human waste onto the ground surface or into surface waters. In addition to the potential water quality impacts, untreated sewage has the potential to introduce bacteria and viruses into the environment. When IHT systems are identified, county or city staff assist the homeowners through the process required to bring their systems into compliance with the septic ordinance.

Beltrami
Big Stone
Chippewa
Chisago
Cook
Dodge
Jackson
Lake
Lake of the Woods
Lincoln
Martin
McLeod
Meeker
Mille Lacs
Pennington
Pipestone
Rice
Scott
Stearns
Recipient
Middle Fork Crow River Watershed District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$120,000
Fund Source

This project contains several activities that will implement effective, shovel ready conservation practices on multiple water bodies. The goal is to reduce the erosion impacting stream bank stability. Three initiatives will be implemented, including the installation of four shoreland restoration/stabilization projects, completion of two stream bank stabilization projects on the Middle Fork Crow River and a rain barrel program. An education program will provide outreach to lake and city residents throughout the Middle Fork Crow River Watershed.

Kandiyohi
Meeker
Pope
Recipient
Redwood Cottonwood Rivers Control Area JPB
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$75,000
Fund Source

The soil and water conservation districts within the watersheds for the Redwood and Cottonwood Rivers have been putting conservation practices on the ground for years in a long-running collaborative effort.

Brown
Cottonwood
Lincoln
Lyon
Murray
Pipestone
Redwood
Yellow Medicine
Recipient
Murray County
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$78,256
Fund Source

Water flows without concern for political jurisdiction boundaries. This often means project work requires a little more coordination. Jackson, Cottonwood and Murray County did the extra coordination to land a grant to reduce sediment to the West Fork of the Des Moines River. The approved grant has four separate projects inthree counties.Jackson County has two projects: the Federated Rural Electric Association sediment control structure and the City of Jackson bioswale.

Cottonwood
Jackson
Murray
Recipient
Area 5 - Southwest Prairie Technical Service Area
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
Fund Source

The Southwest Prairie Technical Service Area 5 (SWPTSA), located in the southwest corner of Minnesota, encompasses 11 Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCDs): Cottonwood, Jackson, Lac Qui Parle, Lincoln, Lyon, Murray, Nobles, Pipestone, Redwood, Rock, and Yellow Medicine. This project will protect natural resources within the three major river basins of Minnesota, Missouri and Des Moines Rivers. The SWPTSA will assist member SWCDs in locating and identifying priority subwatersheds that have soil erosion and water quality issues using terrain analysis.

Cottonwood
Jackson
Lac qui Parle
Lincoln
Lyon
Murray
Nobles
Pipestone
Redwood
Rock
Yellow Medicine
Recipient
Clearwater River WD
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$351,906
Fund Source

This project will construct a stormwater treatment facility to treat runoff from 6,500 acre urban and agricultural drainage area in and around the City of Watkins, MN. The result is an annual phosphorus reduction of 796 pounds to Lake Betsy, the Clearwater River, and the Clearwater River Chain of Lakes.

Meeker
Recipient
Area 2 - West Central Technical Service Area
2019 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$285,000
Fund Source

This proposal will fund technical assistance for nutrient management planning to accelerate water quality improvements with the 12-county West Central Technical Service Area (WCTSA). A needs assessment identified an estimated 156 certified nutrient management plans that will be needed over a 3 year period. Of the 71 SWCD employees in the WCTSA, only 1 SWCD staff member is dedicated to nutrient management planning. To meet technical assistance needs, this grant will fund a Regional Planning Specialist (RPS) to address local resource concerns.

Benton
Big Stone
Chippewa
Douglas
Kandiyohi
Meeker
Morrison
Pope
Stearns
Stevens
Swift
Todd
Recipient
Area 2 - West Central Technical Service Area
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
Fund Source

The West Central Technical Service Area (WCTSA) serves 12 Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCDs) in west central Minnesota and has been experiencing increased workload due to greater requests from member SWCDs. This funding will sustain a limited-term technician and purchase related support equipment to assist landowners in implementing targeted, high priority practices that result in the greatest water quality outcomes.

Benton
Big Stone
Chippewa
Douglas
Kandiyohi
Meeker
Morrison
Pope
Stearns
Stevens
Swift
Todd