Minnesota's Legacy

All Projects

Showing 1 - 6 of 6 | Export projects
Recipient
Minnesota Department of Health
2019 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,100,000
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,100,000
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,100,000
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,100,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,150,000
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,150,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,020,000
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,020,000
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$744,717
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,291
Fund Source

The Drinking Water Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CEC) program identifies environmental contaminants for which current health-based standards currently do not exist or need to be updated, investigate the potential for human exposure to these chemicals, and develop guidance values for drinking water. Contaminants evaluated by CEC staff include contaminants that have been released or detected in Minnesota waters (surface water and groundwater) or that have the potential to migrate to or be detected in Minnesota waters.

Statewide
Recipient
Lake SWCD
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$77,000
Fund Source

When completed, this Lake County-wide culvert inventory project will have multiple direct benefits to water quality protection, natural resource planning, and municipal asset protection. This inventory will be used to provide local and state authorities accurate information on the condition of road crossings, better calibrate hydrological modeling tools crucial to the inter-agency Watershed Restoration and Protection Strategies (WRAPS) process, and assess how road crossings in Lake County are affecting the water and sediment transport capacity of our waterways.

Lake
Recipient
Lake SWCD
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$114,000
Fund Source

This project will implement timber stand improvement activities on over 300 acres of private forest land within the Knife River and Skunk Creek watershed; both are not meeting state water quality standards for turbidity. These activities will culminate in planting diverse, large-statured native trees, resilient in the face of forest pests and diseases, climate change, and deer browse. Through this project, significant areas of the Knife River and Skunk Creek watersheds will have a patchwork of seed sources that will naturally expand the footprint of a healthier forest.

Lake
Recipient
St. Louis County
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000
Fund Source

St. Louis County's Comprehensive Water Management Plan Update 2010-2020 identifies providing financial assistance to qualifying homeowners to upgrade or replace failing septic systems as a Priority 2 action. Funds from the FY-16 Clean Water Fund Projects and Practices Grant will be used to provide funding to low-income homeowners to repair or replace SSTS identified as Imminent Threat to Public Health (ITPH) within the following watersheds: Lake Superior South, St.

St. Louis
Recipient
Multiple public water systems
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$113,000
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
Fund Source

Approximately 70 percent of all Minnesotans rely on groundwater as their primary source of drinking water. Wells used for drinking water must be properly sealed when removed from service to protect both public health and Minnesota’s invaluable groundwater resources. The Minnesota Department of Health protects both public health and groundwater by assuring the proper sealing of unused wells.
Clean Water funds are being provided to well owners as a 50% cost-share assistance for sealing unused public water-supply wells.

Anoka
Beltrami
Benton
Big Stone
Blue Earth
Cook
Crow Wing
Dakota
Dodge
Faribault
Fillmore
Hennepin
Lyon
McLeod
Morrison
Mower
Olmsted
Rice
Sherburne
Sibley
St. Louis
Stearns
Steele
Swift
Todd
Waseca
Washington
Watonwan
Winona
Wright
Recipient
Lake SWCD
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$71,000
Fund Source

This project is designed to complete an inventory and assessment of existing stormwater infrastructure in the cities of Two Harbors and Silver including mapping urban surface and sub-surface storm water flow to determine flow paths, pour points, and areas of limited storm water infrastructural capacity. The results of this assessment will be an assessment with prioritized and targeted opportunities for municipal infrastructure retrofits or best management practice installation on both public and private land.

Lake