Minnesota's Legacy

All Projects

Showing 1 - 40 of 114 | Export projects
Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$301,000
Statewide
Recipient
Blue Earth County Drainage Authority
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$485,000

This project is a model for future drainage projects across the state and represents a fundamental shift in the way rural drainage systems interact with the landscape. This is a community-based water quality and treatment demonstration project in which landowners, local government, and state agencies have developed a watershed approach to improving water quality and replacing outdated drainage systems. The project will improve water quality, improve wildlife habitat, and develop a process for future projects by constructing water quality features within the 6,000 acre watershed.

Blue Earth
Recipient
U of MN - MAISRC
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$8,700,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$4,350,000

Aquatic invasive species pose critical ecological and economic challenges for the entire state and beyond. They can cause irreparable harm to fisheries and aquatic habitat as well as damage to infrastructure. The problems posed by aquatic invasive species continue to grow as existing infestations expand and new exotic species arrive, most of which are poorly understood. New ideas and approaches are needed to develop real solutions.

Statewide
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,000,000

The legislature granted the University of Minnesota $2,000,000 from the LCCMR to start an Aquatic Invasive Species Cooperative Research Center to address and solve aquatic invasive species (AIS) problems in the state. The University will use this initial funding to establish the administrative structure for this center, establish and renovate its facilities, start studies of Asian carp biology designed to control this species, and develop work plans for the LCCMR to ensure continuing funding for the center.

Recipient
U of MN - MAISRC
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,700,000
Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000
Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$236,000
Statewide
Recipient
Benton Soil and Water Conservation District
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$431,000
Benton
Morrison
Recipient
U of MN - Duluth NRRI
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$334,000
Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$320,000
Statewide
Recipient
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$700,000
Hennepin
Ramsey
Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$148,000
Statewide
Recipient
U of MN - Duluth
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$262,000

Silver carp are migrating north up the Mississippi River and pose threats to the native fish and aquatic ecosystems of Minnesota rivers and lakes where they can become established. Additionally, the unique jumping ability of silver carp also places recreational boaters in danger of being injured during collisions with airborne fish. However, it is believed that this jumping ability could potentially be exploited as a weakness to help detect, manage, and control silver carp populations. Researchers at the University of Minnesota – Duluth, in cooperation with the U.S.

Statewide
Recipient
Minnesota Department of Agriculture
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$99,000

Brown marmorated stink bug is a terrestrial invasive species in Minnesota that was first discovered in 2010 and has been expanding its range since. It is a generalist plant pest that attacks more than 300 species of plants in natural, agricultural, and horticultural settings and is known for its unpleasant odor, large numbers, and propensity for home invasion. Proactive management approaches are available and in development that can be used to slow and potentially control brown marmorated stink bug populations.

Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$167,000

Brown marmorated stink bug is a terrestrial invasive species in Minnesota that was first discovered in 2010 and has been expanding its range since. It is a generalist plant pest that attacks more than 300 species of plants in natural, agricultural, and horticultural settings and is known for its unpleasant odor, large numbers, and propensity for home invasion. Proactive management approaches are available and in development that can be used to slow and potentially control brown marmorated stink bug populations.

Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$398,000
Anoka
Isanti
Recipient
Great River Greening
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$524,000
Carver
Chisago
Hennepin
Recipient
Wilderness Inquiry
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,200,000
Statewide
Recipient
Board of Water and Soil Resources
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$6,000,000
Statewide
Recipient
Board of Water and Soil Resources
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,729,000
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$13,500,000
2019 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$5,000,000
Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$350,000

Though they are a relatively unnoticed group of species, native freshwater mussels are a critical part of river ecosystems because they provide a variety of important functions including improved water clarity, enhanced streambed stability, reduced downstream transport of contaminants, and creation of habitat for other aquatic life. However, mussel populations in Minnesota have declined in recent decades as a result of habitat destruction, pollution, land-use change, over-harvesting, and the introduction of exotic species.

Statewide
Recipient
MN DNR
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$135,000
Statewide
Recipient
U of MN - MN Geological Survey
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,000,000
Statewide
Recipient
University of Minnesota - MN Geological Survey
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$600,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$600,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide
Recipient
MN DNR
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Anoka
Blue Earth
Clay
Nicollet
Renville
Sibley
Wright
Recipient
MN DNR
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Cook
Lake
St. Louis
Recipient
Headwaters Science Center
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$121,000
Beltrami
Cass
Clearwater
Hubbard
Recipient
Department of Military Affairs
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,000,000
Morrison
Recipient
Board of Water and Soil Resources
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$540,000
Statewide
Recipient
U of MN - Duluth NRRI
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Mine stockpiles are unproductive due to soil deficiencies of organic matter, nutrients, and soil organisms, which are essential to supporting healthy plant growth, diversity, and succession. Waste products, including biosolids, composts, and dredged materials, have the potential to be used to address some of these deficiencies and make the lands productive again.

St. Louis
Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$636,000

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been decimating ash throughout the Great Lake States and is currently advancing into Minnesota, threatening the future of the ash forests that occur across much of the state. Of particular concern is the impact EAB will have on the ecology and functioning of black ash swamps, which cover over one million acres in Minnesota and represent the state’s most common ash forest type. Black ash trees grow and thrive in swamps and occupy a unique wet niche where few other tree species grow.

Aitkin
Becker
Beltrami
Carlton
Cass
Clearwater
Cook
Crow Wing
Hubbard
Itasca
Kanabec
Koochiching
Lake
Lake of the Woods
Mille Lacs
Morrison
Pine
Roseau
St. Louis
Stearns
Recipient
Pheasants Forever Inc
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$400,000
Statewide
Recipient
Voyageurs National Park
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$293,000
Koochiching
St. Louis
Recipient
Minnesota Department of Agriculture
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$729,000
Statewide
Recipient
Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,000,000
Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$864,000

Pollinators play a key role in ecosystem function and in agriculture, including thousands of native plants and more than one hundred U.S. crops that either need or benefit from pollinators. However, pollinators are in dramatic decline in Minnesota and throughout the country. The causes of the decline are not completely understood, but identified factors include loss of nesting sites, fewer flowers, increased disease, and increased pesticide use. Fortunately, there are known actions that can be taken to help counteract some of these factors.

Statewide
Recipient
U of MN - St. Anthony Falls Laboratory
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$294,000
Statewide
Recipient
U of MN - Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$388,000
Anoka
Isanti
Recipient
Central Lakes College
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$60,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$60,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$500,000

Wastewater treatment plants discharge effluent that contains contaminants of emerging concern, such as estrogens. Estrogens have been shown to cause ecological effects such as fish feminization and fish population collapses. Presently the treatment and discharge of estrogens into the environment via wastewater treatment is not regulated. However, it has been found that the extent of estrogen discharge from wastewater treatment correlates with how and how well nitrogen, which currently is regulated and will likely be more so in the future, is removed during the treatment process.

Statewide