Minnesota's Legacy

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Recipient
Ramsey Conservation District
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000
Fund Source

The purpose of this program is to engage community groups for the installation of community accessible rain gardens and other water quality best management practices in Ramsey County. The goal is to install 6-12 storm water best management projects that will help protect and improve water quality of surrounding lakes. The installed practices will reduce an estimated 10 acre-feet of storm water runoff, 9 pounds of phosphorous, and 3 tons of sediment annually. Significant measurable outputs, with development of long-term partnerships, are primary objectives for this program.

Ramsey
Recipient
Vadnais Lake Area WMO
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$97,000
Fund Source
Ramsey
Recipient
Ramsey-Washington Metro WD
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000
Fund Source

Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District (RWMWD) will improve water quality in Casey Lake and ultimately Kohlman Lake through the installation of approximately 25 rain gardens on priority properties identified as part of the Casey Lake Urban Stormwater Retrofit Assessment completed by Ramsey Conservation District (RCD) in 2011.

Ramsey
Recipient
Lower Mississippi River WMO
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$700,000
Fund Source
Dakota
Ramsey
Recipient
Ramsey-Washington Metro WD
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$58,515
Fund Source

The Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District (District) has determined that large impervious sites (like churches, commercial sites, and schools) are more economical for stormwater management retrofit projects than distributed small projects along roadways. The District began assessing church sites for retrofit opportunities in 2013 and will continue this effort in 2014. Church congregations have been receptive to partnering with the watershed district.

Ramsey
Washington
Recipient
Ramsey-Washington Metro WD
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000
Fund Source

The Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District (RWMWD) is responsible for the protection and restoration of the water quality of 20 lakes and 5 creeks within its boundary. Permit and voluntary cost share programs serve to slowly redevelop the watershed to the benefit of these water bodies. However, additional projects are needed- not only to implement green infrastructure in areas that need extra restoration and protection, but also to foster new relationships between citizens and the RWMWD to rally together in a common goal to the benefit of their water resources.

Ramsey
Washington
Recipient
Ramsey Conservation District
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$59,766
Fund Source

Past and current monitoring data has shown Ramsey County's Lambert Creek has high levels of total phosphorus (TP), anywhere from 0.14 mg/L to 0.30 mg/L, which is above the proposed State standard of 0.10 mg/L for streams in the Central Region.

Ramsey
Recipient
Rice Creek WD
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$280,000
Fund Source

Little Lake Johanna is not meeting state water quality standards due to excessive phosphorus. The Rice Creek Watershed District, in partnership with the City of Roseville, will improve the water quality of stormwater runoff into Little Lake Johanna through installation of an iron-enhanced sand filter. The Oasis Pond Iron-Enhanced Sand Filter Project will annually remove approximately 34 pounds of phosphorus from runoff to Little Lake Johanna annually. This is equal to nearly 20% of the needed load reduction as established by the Southwest Urban Lakes Total Maximum Daily Load Study.

Ramsey
Recipient
Ramsey Conservation District
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000
Fund Source

Ramsey County has 3,500+ acres tied to 358 faith organizations and 304 schools. On average, these properties contribute 1 billion gallons of stormwater runoff, 3,000 lbs of phosphorus, and 1,000 tons of sediment to our local water bodies. The Ramsey Conservation District (RCD), working with community partners and Watershed Districts/Water Management Organizations, will install 6-12 stormwater best management projects that will help protect and improve water quality of surrounding lakes.

Ramsey
Recipient
Ramsey Conservation District
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000
Fund Source

The purpose of this program is to provide cost share funding to community groups for the installation of community accessible rain gardens and other water quality projects in Ramsey County. The Ramsey Conservation District (RCD) in partnership with local property owners and Watershed Districts/Water Management Organizations will install 6-12 stormwater best management projects that will help protect and improve water quality of surrounding lakes, streams, rivers, and wetlands.

Ramsey
Recipient
Ramsey Conservation District
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$108,000
Fund Source

Ramsey County, the most densely populated county in Minnesota, generates high levels of contaminated runoff from its impervious surfaces. When contaminants drain into abandoned and unused wells, it threatens the health of Ramsey County citizens who depend on groundwater as their main potable water source.

Ramsey
Recipient
Ramsey Conservation District
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$108,000
Fund Source

Ramsey County, the most densely populated county in Minnesota, generates high levels of contaminated runoff from its impervious surfaces, which can have damaging effects on both surface water and groundwater. Concerns arise when these contaminants drain into abandoned and unused wells, threatening the quality of groundwater, especially in drinking water supply areas, wellhead protection areas, or groundwater recharge zones.

Ramsey
Recipient
Capitol Region WD
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$360,000
Fund Source

Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD), in partnership with the City of Roseville, will construct a volume reduction/capture-reuse irrigation facility below the Upper Villa Park Softball field in the City of Roseville. This project will protect Lake McCarrons and the Villa Park Wetland System (VPWS) by reducing runoff volumes and the pollutants associated with urban stormwater such as Total Phosphorus (TP), Total Suspended Solids (TSS), heavy metals, and petroleum products among others.

Ramsey
Recipient
Capitol Region WD
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000
Fund Source

Capitol Region Watershed District is partnering with St. Paul Public Schools to implement a variety of highly visible Best Management Practices at Central High School that will improve the quality of stormwater discharged to the Mississippi River. A tremendous amount of sediment is discharged from the school annually due to the large impervious areas and lack of vegetation. Implementing the projects will reduce sediment by 86% and phosphorus by 90% over the target area annually.

Ramsey
Recipient
Rice Creek WD
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$25,000
Fund Source

The Rice Creek Watershed District (RCWD) will create a web-based, mobile-compatible public drainage system inspection and maintenance database. This database system will enable District staff to create and track maintenance requests and inspections from the field, including Geo-referencing locations requiring repair via a mobile device. The system will greatly reduce the time required to identify and log each maintenance request, enabling staff to inventory more miles of public drainage system yearly thereby identifying erosion problems more efficiently and thoroughly.

Anoka
Hennepin
Ramsey
Washington
Recipient
Ramsey-Washington Metro WD
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$54,083
Fund Source

The Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District (District) has determined that large impervious sites (like churches, commercial sites, and schools) are more economical for stormwater management retrofit projects than distributed small projects along roadways. Analysis of the watershed land use indicates that large impervious sites are typically commercial properties (primarily retail), churches, and schools. The District began assessing church sites for retrofit opportunities in 2013 and will continue this effort in 2014.

Ramsey
Washington
Recipient
Multiple public water systems
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$113,000
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
Fund Source

Approximately 70 percent of all Minnesotans rely on groundwater as their primary source of drinking water. Wells used for drinking water must be properly sealed when removed from service to protect both public health and Minnesota’s invaluable groundwater resources. The Minnesota Department of Health protects both public health and groundwater by assuring the proper sealing of unused wells.
Clean Water funds are being provided to well owners as a 50% cost-share assistance for sealing unused public water-supply wells.

Anoka
Beltrami
Benton
Big Stone
Blue Earth
Cook
Crow Wing
Dakota
Dodge
Faribault
Fillmore
Hennepin
Lyon
McLeod
Morrison
Mower
Olmsted
Rice
Sherburne
Sibley
St. Louis
Stearns
Steele
Swift
Todd
Waseca
Washington
Watonwan
Winona
Wright
Recipient
Ramsey-Washington Metro WD
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000
Fund Source

Wakefield Lake is in the Ramsey-Washington Metro Watershed District (RWMWD) and is impaired for excess phosphorus. Through the Wakefield Lake TMDL process, implementation activities have been identified which include partnerships with the City of Maplewood to install BMPs in the watershed to directly benefit Wakefield Lake. RWMWD has researched, monitored and field tested the use of spent lime for stormwater quality treatment.

Ramsey
Recipient
Capitol Region WD
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$200,000
Fund Source

Capitol Region Watershed District will partner with local organizations and private landowners to implement a variety of cost-effective Best Management Practices in the East Kittsondale subwatershed. The urbanized condition of the 1,860 acre subwatershed results in an estimated 1,500 pounds of phosphorus, over 470,000 pounds of sediment, and significant concentrations of bacteria associated with that sediment being sent untreated to the Mississippi River each year. Those pollutants have contributed to several impairments within the river.

Ramsey
Recipient
Ramsey Conservation District
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$60,500
Fund Source

The Ramsey Conservation District is partnering with the Vadnais Lake Area Water Management Organization, St. Paul Regional Water Service, and Ramsey County Parks and Recreation to restore and stabilize approximately 550 linear feet of streambank along the Sucker Lake Channel in northeastern Ramsey County with a cost effective critical area planting, replacing the existing mix of turf grass and asphalt streambank with a native vegetation planting.

Ramsey
Recipient
Ramsey-Washington Metro WD
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000
Fund Source

This project will continue collaboration with faith organizations in priority areas to implement stormwater volume reduction retrofit projects. Priority areas are defined as areas with limited to no stormwater treatment before reaching a water body and/or areas that drain to an impaired or at risk water.

Ramsey
Washington
Recipient
St. Paul, City of
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$695,000
Fund Source

At almost 4,000 acres, Trout Brook is the largest subwatershed in the Capitol Region Watershed District and the City of Saint Paul. The restored stream is part of the 42 acre Trout Brook Nature Sanctuary project, whose goal is to return the area back to some resemblance of its pre-industrialized valley of stream floodplain and wetlands. Monitoring results within the corridor show that phosphorus, sediments, bacteria, lead and copper are the pollutants of most concern.

Ramsey
Recipient
Ramsey Conservation District
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$56,000
Fund Source

Ramsey County is the smallest, most densely populated county in the state of Minnesota consisting of primarily urbanized land use. Ramsey County's water resources provide the industrial base, drinking water, and recreational opportunities for over one-half million people on a daily basis. The major environmental problems that Ramsey County lakes and streams face can be traced to the effects that urbanized land use has on these natural resources.

Ramsey