Minnesota's Legacy

All Projects

Showing 1 - 22 of 22 | Export projects
Recipient
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Division of Ecological and Water Resources
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,177,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,513,000

To address the problems caused by invasive species, the 1991 Minnesota Legislature directed the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to establish the Invasive Species Program. The program is designed to implement actions to prevent the spread of invasive species and manage invasive aquatic plants and wild animals (Minnesota Statutes 84D).
The three primary goals of the DNR Invasive Species Program are to:
1. Prevent the introduction of new invasive species into Minnesota.
2. Prevent the spread of invasive species within Minnesota.

Recipient
St. Cloud State University
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$125,816
Fund Source

This project is a continuation of Statewide Lake study that revealed the obiquitous presence of endrocrine active compounds (EACs) in many MN Lakes. The initial project findings suggested two potential knowledge gaps in our understanding of EACs and their effects in lake environments. First, the sources of EACs and their entrance points into lakes need to be better defined than was possible in our previous statewide lake study.

Statewide
Recipient
MPCA
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Project Overview

Cook
Lake
St. Louis
Recipient
Metro Blooms
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$279,000

Project Overview

Hennepin
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Common carp, introduced from eastern Europe over a century ago, are an invasive species in Minnesota that adversely affect water quality and aquatic communities, particularly in shallow lakes and wetlands. While solutions for suppressing common carp reproduction and abundance are emerging, controlling the movement of common carp, and therefore preventing reinfestation, has so far proved difficult.

Carver
Hennepin
Recipient
MN DNR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$825,000

Deep, cold-water lakes have different physical properties and support different wildlife than their more numerous shallow counterparts. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is using this appropriation to conduct a study that will help identify, monitor, and predict the consequences of climate change and land use changes on water quality, habitat dynamics, and fish populations in deep, cold-water lakes.

Recipient
MN DNR
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Cook
Lake
St. Louis
Recipient
Dept. of Agriculture
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide
Recipient
USGS
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$125,000

Ballast water - water carried in tanks on ships to help provide stability and aid steering - is likely the single greatest source for introduction of non-native and invasive aquatic species. Ballast water is collected in one body of water and discharged into another body of water, usually large distances apart. At least one new invasive species is found in the Great Lakes every year, with Lake Superior being particularly at risk. Scientists from the U.S.

Cook
Lake
St. Louis
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$175,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Aitkin
Becker
Beltrami
Benton
Carlton
Cass
Clearwater
Cook
Crow Wing
Hubbard
Itasca
Koochiching
Lake
Lake of the Woods
Mahnomen
Marshall
Morrison
Otter Tail
Pennington
Pine
Polk
Red Lake
Roseau
St. Louis
Todd
Wadena
Recipient
Central Lakes College
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$60,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$60,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide
Recipient
MN DNR
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$145,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results
DNR spent $140,689 to continue on-site field investigations to accelerate management of shallow lakes and adjacent wetland complexes and support the accomplishments of Ducks Unlimited through HCP 2c and 3c. Temporary field personnel (1 full time and up to 6 temporary) documented shallow lake habitat occurrence and quality. Habitat surveys were conducted on 171 lakes within seven HCP project areas. The lakes surveyed totaled over 82,831acres. The surveys were distributed more broadly than in the past with:

Statewide
Recipient
DNR
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$45,000

OVERALL PROJECT OUTCOME AND RESULTS

Recipient
University of Minnesota - Duluth
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$125,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$125,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$80,000

Over the last decade, a parasitic disease, Heterosporosis, has spread to infect fish in at least 20 water bodies in Minnesota. The parasite infects a number of economically important fish, making them inedible. As the disease can currently only be detected in its late stages, little is known about how it is transmitted and how best to control it.

Recipient
Audubon Minnesota
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$151,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide
Recipient
Science Museum of Minnesota
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Overall Project Outcome and Results

Benton
Big Stone
Blue Earth
Brown
Carver
Chippewa
Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$297,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide
Recipient
University of Minnesota - NRRI
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000

Earthworms are common throughout much of Minnesota, but few realize that they are not native to the state and were in fact introduced from Europe and Asia. Earthworms are invasive in Minnesota and have been shown to have large and potentially irreversible impacts on hardwood forest biodiversity and regeneration. As dispersal by human actions is the primary means of introduction and spread of invasive earthworms, there exists great potential to arrest the current spread of earthworms already present and prevent the introduction of additional species.

Recipient
Martin County Soil and Water Conservation District
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$73,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$74,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Martin
Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$545,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Ramsey
Recipient
USGS
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$297,000

Endocrine disrupting contaminants are chemicals that may interfere with natural hormones in humans and wildlife and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, and immune effects. These chemicals occur in a variety of everyday products, including pharmaceuticals, plastics, detergents, flame retardants, cosmetics, and pesticides. As these chemicals get discharged into the environment, humans and wildlife are exposed. The U.S. Geological Survey and St.

Ramsey