Minnesota's Legacy

All Projects

Showing 1 - 14 of 14 | Export projects
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Through various means, human produced chemicals can make their way into surface waters where they can have adverse effects on the function of ecological communities. Of particular concern are antibiotics and other antimicrobial substances because they have the potential to create increased antibiotic resistance. While there is a background level of naturally occurring antibiotic resistance in the natural world, elevated or persistent levels caused by human activities have the potential to harm human, animal, and overall ecosystem health.

Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$854,000

Invasive carp species, including silver carp and bighead carp, are migrating north up the Mississippi River and pose threats to the native fish and aquatic ecosystems of Minnesota rivers and lakes where they can become established. While individual carp have been found in Minnesota, it is not presently believed that there are established breeding populations in the state.

Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$400,000

Minnesota ranks #2 in hog production and #1 in sugar beet production in the U.S., generating about 11 million tons of pig manure and over one million tons of sugar processing wastes annually. Presently there are not cost-effective methods available to deal with these waste streams other than land application, which usually results in nutrient runoff into ground and surface water resources.

Statewide
Recipient
Minnesota Geological Survey
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,130,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Isanti
Olmsted
Sherburne
Wright
Recipient
U of MN - MN Geological Survey
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,200,000

The Minnesota County Geologic Atlas program is an ongoing effort begun in 1979 that is being conducted jointly by the University of Minnesota’s Minnesota Geological Survey and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR). This portion, called Part A and conducted by the Minnesota Geological Survey, collects geologic information to produce maps and databases that define aquifer boundaries and the connection of aquifers to the land surface and surface water resources.

Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$246,000

Waste streams often contain unutilized resources that if properly extracted or otherwise utilized could be used to provide additional sources of renewable energy or other benefits. Wastewater is one of the primary candidate waste streams because of its nutrient content and researchers have been developing technologies such as microbial fuel cells and algal-based biofuel production in order make use of these nutrients.

Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$279,000

Many types of bacteria perform critical ecological functions, such as cycling carbon and other nutrients, which enable life to exist. In fact, humans harness these types of bacteria in certain engineered systems, such as wastewater treatment plants and landfills, to provide various benefits such as protecting surface waters from excess nitrogen, decomposing solid waste, and treating wastewater.

Statewide
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$278,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$279,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$300,000

Rainfall runoff in urban areas contributes to localized flooding and washes contaminants and excess nutrients downstream affecting water quality. Systems to mitigate these problems can be challenging to implement in urban areas due to existing infrastructure and competing demands for land use. However, one option is to find alternative applications for the excess rainwater and use it replace the potable water that is currently being used for certain purposes. Researchers at the University of Minnesota are using this appropriation to evaluate alternative uses for captured rainwater.

Statewide
Recipient
U of MN
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$291,000

Pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and agricultural nutrients serve important functions in crop production and the treatment of disease. However, these chemicals become pollutants when discharged into surface waters through wastewater, storm water, and agricultural runoff. There are natural processes, though, that help break down and remove these pollutants from water. One such process is the role that sunlight interacting with dissolved organic matter naturally present in surface water from decaying plant materials and algae has in transforming these contaminants.

Statewide
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2010 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000

Native trout require clean, cold water that usually originates from springs, but the springs feeding the 173 designated trout streams in southeastern Minnesota are under increasing pressure from current and expected changes in land use. This joint effort by the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is working to identify and map the springs and the areas that feed water to these springs and to learn how these waters might be affected by development and water use.

Dakota
Dodge
Fillmore
Goodhue
Hennepin
Houston
Mower
Olmsted
Ramsey
Scott
Wabasha
Washington
Winona
Recipient
U of MN
2011 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$327,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$90,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$90,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Statewide
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$140,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$140,000

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Dakota
Fillmore
Goodhue
Houston
Olmsted
Wabasha
Winona