Minnesota's Legacy

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Showing 1 - 4 of 4 | Export projects
Recipient
Dakota SWCD
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000
Fund Source

This project will use the Dakota County Soil and Water Conservation District's existing Conservation Initiative Funding program to provide technical assistance and monetary incentives for targeted, medium-sized projects such as raingardens, bioinfiltration, biofiltration, bioswales, shoreline stabilizations, and other best management practices (BMPs). Project proposals will be solicited from faith based organizations, homeowner associations, school organizations, lake associations, and others that own or manage large areas of land.

Dakota
Recipient
Dakota County Water Resources Department- Jill V. Trescott, (952) 891-7019
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,838
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$23,176
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$36,554
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$35,572
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$36,122
Fund Source

This project provides information to better understand nitrogen fertilizer management and the potential impacts to local groundwater.

Goals:

Dakota
Recipient
Rice County
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$103,875
Fund Source

The Cannon River Watershed includes approximately 941,000 acres of primarily agricultural landscape. Because of its large size, four subwatershed lobes are often referenced: Straight River Watershed, Upper Cannon River Watershed, Middle Cannon River Watershed, and the Lower Cannon River Watershed. Rice County is proposing utilizing LiDAR topographic data to determine areas of highest importance for Best Management Practice (BMP) Implementation for sediment within the Middle and Lower Cannon subwatersheds.

Dakota
Goodhue
Rice
Recipient
Multiple public water systems
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$113,000
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
Fund Source

Approximately 70 percent of all Minnesotans rely on groundwater as their primary source of drinking water. Wells used for drinking water must be properly sealed when removed from service to protect both public health and Minnesota’s invaluable groundwater resources. The Minnesota Department of Health protects both public health and groundwater by assuring the proper sealing of unused wells.
Clean Water funds are being provided to well owners as a 50% cost-share assistance for sealing unused public water-supply wells.

Anoka
Beltrami
Benton
Big Stone
Blue Earth
Cook
Crow Wing
Dakota
Dodge
Faribault
Fillmore
Hennepin
Lyon
McLeod
Morrison
Mower
Olmsted
Rice
Sherburne
Sibley
St. Louis
Stearns
Steele
Swift
Todd
Waseca
Washington
Watonwan
Winona
Wright