Minnesota's Legacy

All Projects

Showing 1 - 14 of 14 | Export projects
Recipient
Dakota SWCD
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$150,000
Fund Source

This project will use the Dakota County Soil and Water Conservation District's existing Conservation Initiative Funding program to provide technical assistance and monetary incentives for targeted, medium-sized projects such as raingardens, bioinfiltration, biofiltration, bioswales, shoreline stabilizations, and other best management practices (BMPs). Project proposals will be solicited from faith based organizations, homeowner associations, school organizations, lake associations, and others that own or manage large areas of land.

Dakota
Recipient
South Saint Louis County Soil and Water Conservation District
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$106,931
Fund Source

The goal of this project is to develop a stream restoration opportunities matrix for the Amity Creek watershed, which will prioritize the various protection and restoration options in the watershed for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) and local partners.

St. Louis
Recipient
Dakota County Water Resources Department- Jill V. Trescott, (952) 891-7019
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,838
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$23,176
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$36,554
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$35,572
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$36,122
Fund Source

This project provides information to better understand nitrogen fertilizer management and the potential impacts to local groundwater.

Goals:

Dakota
Recipient
South Saint Louis County Soil and Water Conservation District
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$51,875
Fund Source

The purpose of the project is to fill critical data gaps - this data will provide a foundation for future development of watershed models, Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) reports and the creation of a Watershed Restoration and Protection Strategy (WRAPS) report.

St. Louis
Recipient
Lake County Soil and Water Conservation District
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$83,000
Fund Source
The main purpose of this project is to provide fiscal resources for Lake County Soil and Water Conservation District (Lake County SWCD) to be engaged and participate in efforts for civic engagement in the Lake Superior South (LS South) Lake Superior North (LS North) watersheds and lead and carry-out civic engagement in the early stages of the Watershed Restoration and Protection Strategies (WRAPS) process in the Cloquet River watershed.
Lake
Recipient
University of Minnesota
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$199,981
Fund Source

This project will dentify critical pathways and areas on the landscape that contribute a disproportionate amount of sediment stressors to selected streams located in LS South and/or LS North HUC 8 watersheds. Unlike other HUC 8 watersheds with one mainstem stream and nested tributaries to the mainstem, LS South and North consist of numerous individual streams flowing to Lake Superior. Each of these streams has a mainstem, tributaries flowing to the mainstem and a surrounding watershed.

Cook
Lake
Recipient
Lake SWCD
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$77,000
Fund Source

When completed, this Lake County-wide culvert inventory project will have multiple direct benefits to water quality protection, natural resource planning, and municipal asset protection. This inventory will be used to provide local and state authorities accurate information on the condition of road crossings, better calibrate hydrological modeling tools crucial to the inter-agency Watershed Restoration and Protection Strategies (WRAPS) process, and assess how road crossings in Lake County are affecting the water and sediment transport capacity of our waterways.

Lake
Recipient
Lake of the Woods SWCD
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$46,750
Fund Source

The sixth largest fresh water lake in the United States, Lake of the Woods has sustained significant shoreline erosion through a number of high water events, high inflows from the Rainy River, sustained strong NW winds, and erodible soils on the southern shore. This project implements strategies to protect and enhance private shoreline on the lake by addressing long-term shoreline management.

Lake of the Woods
Recipient
Lake of the Woods SWCD
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$305,620
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$66,412
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$47,202
Fund Source

The Lake of the Woods (LOW) Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) study will: (1) identify water quality goals for the Minnesota portions of the LOW/Rainy River Watershed; (2) recommend nutrient allocations to achieve TMDLs where waters do not meet standards; and (3) provide opportunities for stakeholders to engage in the process of watershed-management planning to adopt protection and restoration strategies. The project will include existing in-lake and watershed model updates, TMDL component development, restoration plan development, and public participation.

Lake of the Woods
Recipient
Rice County
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$103,875
Fund Source

The Cannon River Watershed includes approximately 941,000 acres of primarily agricultural landscape. Because of its large size, four subwatershed lobes are often referenced: Straight River Watershed, Upper Cannon River Watershed, Middle Cannon River Watershed, and the Lower Cannon River Watershed. Rice County is proposing utilizing LiDAR topographic data to determine areas of highest importance for Best Management Practice (BMP) Implementation for sediment within the Middle and Lower Cannon subwatersheds.

Dakota
Goodhue
Rice
Recipient
Minnesota Department of Agriculture and Multiple local partners
2019 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$3,000,000
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,000,000
2017 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,500,000
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$2,500,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,500,000
2014 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$1,500,000
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$132,830
2012 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$173,380
Fund Source

The Minnesota Ag Water Quality Certification Program (MAWQCP) is a voluntary opportunity for farmers and agricultural landowners to take the lead on implementing conservation practices that protect water quality. Those who implement and maintain approved conservation practices will be certified and in turn obtain regulatory certainty for a period of ten years. This program will help address concerns about changing regulatory requirements from multiple state and federal agencies.

Faribault
Jackson
Martin
Olmsted
Otter Tail
Stearns
Wabasha
Wilkin
Winona
Recipient
Goodhue SWCD
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$317,984
Fund Source

This grant application will focus on the construction of multiple targeted best management practices (BMPs) in priority areas which will provide measurable reductions in sediment and phosphorus loadings to cold water streams in the Mississippi River/Lake Pepin Watershed. The installation of these BMPs will also protect the existing stream habitat by reducing peak flows and reduced streambank erosion.

Goodhue
Wabasha
Recipient
Multiple public water systems
2013 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
2016 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$113,000
2018 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$250,000
Fund Source

Approximately 70 percent of all Minnesotans rely on groundwater as their primary source of drinking water. Wells used for drinking water must be properly sealed when removed from service to protect both public health and Minnesota’s invaluable groundwater resources. The Minnesota Department of Health protects both public health and groundwater by assuring the proper sealing of unused wells.
Clean Water funds are being provided to well owners as a 50% cost-share assistance for sealing unused public water-supply wells.

Anoka
Beltrami
Benton
Big Stone
Blue Earth
Cook
Crow Wing
Dakota
Dodge
Faribault
Fillmore
Hennepin
Lyon
McLeod
Morrison
Mower
Olmsted
Rice
Sherburne
Sibley
St. Louis
Stearns
Steele
Swift
Todd
Waseca
Washington
Watonwan
Winona
Wright
Recipient
St. Paul, City of
2015 Fiscal Year Funding Amount
$695,000
Fund Source

At almost 4,000 acres, Trout Brook is the largest subwatershed in the Capitol Region Watershed District and the City of Saint Paul. The restored stream is part of the 42 acre Trout Brook Nature Sanctuary project, whose goal is to return the area back to some resemblance of its pre-industrialized valley of stream floodplain and wetlands. Monitoring results within the corridor show that phosphorus, sediments, bacteria, lead and copper are the pollutants of most concern.

Ramsey